Bill & LaVonne Lee
Present
 

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The JUDAY and JUDY Books

The four W's of family  history are Who  were they? What did they do?  When and Where did they do it? These four W's are covered in detail for the related JUDAY and JUDY surnames in the four books described below for most of the states west of Indiana.  These books are not family histories, as such, for any specific JUDAY or JUDY family, but most assuredly could provide some missing links to your special family history for either of these two names, or related families.  The books are the next best thing to actually going to every county courthouse in the states covered, to research the records yourself.  You will not find more information on the names JUDAY and JUDY for the selected states in any one place.

Matilda JUDAY, born 15 September, 1844, was one of LaVonne Lee's great-grandmothers on her mother's side of the family.  In 1987 she and her husband, Bill Lee, began traveling from county to county throughout the Western United States doing research on a number of family names, JUDAY among them.  It soon became evident  that the similarity of the  names  JUDAY and JUDY caused  problems  in  the county records, and were often confused for each other. Consequently, they began taking information on both names.  The end result has been a great deal of information gathered on the two names. Wishing to share this information with others who are interested in the history of the JUDAYs and/or JUDYs, they prepared these books  and are now offering them to the public.


JUDAY and JUDY in the West

Includes the states of Arizona, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico,
North and South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming
and parts of California and Texas.
 

Compiled and prepared by Bill and LaVonne Lee.

133 pages, double-columned, full-name index, softcover (8 1/2 X 11) 2007.
ISBN-13:  978-0-9795830-8-7.
ISBN-10:  0-9795830-8-X.

From 1987 and 1996 Bill and LaVonne Lee visited county courthouses between Ohio and the Pacific Ocean, gathering information from courthouse records on the names JUDAY and JUDY.  They are presenting the results of this research in a series of informative books to be used by serious researchers of these two names.  JUDAY and JUDY in West is the fourth, and last, of this series.  JUDAY and JUDY in the Pacific Northwest, published in 1989, JUDAY and JUDY in Indiana, published in 2005, and JUDAY and JUDY in Missouri, published earlier in 2007, are the other three.  Accumulated, the four books contain abstracts of every occurrence found of the surnames JUDAY and JUDY in every county courthouse in the states of Arizona, Idaho, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North and South Dakota, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and parts of California, Colorado, Indiana, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Ohio, Oklahoma and Texas.  A grand total of 22 states and 766 county courthouses.  JUDAY and JUDY in the West covers those states listed above with the book's title.

The book contains articles about the families taken from local histories and newspaper articles that reveal many family connections and a great deal of family and local history.  The County Records Section of the book contains 105 pages of thumbnail sketches from more than 1500 county records, taken directly from the records themselves and showing abbreviated detail of the contents of these public records.  Records included are over 850 marriage records, more than 250 civil and criminal court records, nearly 70 probate court records, more than 340 birth and death records and a smattering of military discharge recordings.  Every name in this book is indexed - over 6000 names, including more than 1800 JUDYs and over 150 JUDAYs.  These records answer a great number of the Who, What, Where and When questions.  A copy of the book's Introduction is shown below.

JUDAY and JUDY in the West is a MUST for the serious JUDAY and/or JUDY researcher.  Be sure to advise other JUDAY/JUDY researchers who would benefit from this informative book, and keep in mind that the book would make an outstanding gift for any JUDY or JUDAY family tree researcher.

The cost of JUDAY and JUDY in the West  is $23.95, including shipping and handling.

SOLD OUT

NOTICE:  ALTHOUGH ALL COPIES OF THIS BOOK HAVE BEEN SOLD OUT, A GREAT DEAL OF JUDAY INFORMATION FROM THE RESEARCH THAT WENT INTO THE BOOK CAN BE FOUND AT FODGERelations.com.

AS ALWAYS, MANY THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST IN OUR RESEARCH, AND MAY YOUR SEARCHES BE FRUITFUL AND REWARDING.

                                                                                                                      BILL and LaVONNE LEE


Introduction to

JUDAY and JUDY in the West

One of LaVonne Lee's  maternal grandmothers  was a JUDAY.  From 1988 to 1996 we traveled from county to county throughout the Western States doing research on a number of family names, JUDAY among them.  Because of the similarities in the names JUDAY and JUDY (a good number of the JUDAYs pronounce their name JUDY)  we also  gathered  data  on  that  name  as  well.   The end result has been a great deal of information gathered on the JUDAY and JUDY surnames.  Wishing to share this information with others who are interested in the history of JUDYs and/or JUDAYs we have prepared four books detailing our findings.  JUDAY and JUDY in the Pacific Northwest  was completed in 1989 and includes the results of our research in Idaho, Oregon and Washington.  JUDAY and JUDY in Indiana was completed in 2005 and includes results of our research from selected Indiana counties.  JUDAY and JUDY in Missouri and parts of Colorado, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Ohio and Oklahoma reported our findings from each of Missouri’s 114 counties plus St Louis City, and selected counties in the other states listed in the title and was completed earlier this year.  JUDAY and JUDY in the West Includes Arizona, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nevada, North and South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming and parts of California and Texas presents our research from the indicated states.  This book completes our JUDAY/JUDY series.  These books may be found in many libraries and may be purchased directly from us at our website, http://www.baseballundertaker.com/juday.html.

This book contains selected articles of interest on the JUDAY and JUDY names from the states indicated above, and abstracts of county courthouse records described below.  We searched the indices of county courthouse records in every county in the states of Arizona, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North and South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming.  If a county from one of those states is missing in the book it is because we did not find any indexed records for the subject names in the missing county.  With the exception of California’s Fresno County, our California information was found either in libraries or on the internet.  We did do a thorough search of birth, marriage and death records (not civil, criminal or probate court records) in Fresno County.  The remainder of the California marriage records were taken from microfiche furnished by the California Department of Health and cover only the years of 1960 to 1985.  With the exception of Fresno County, the California death records also came from the California Department of Health, were found at Rootsweb.com and cover the years 1940 to 1997.  These were supplemented by information found on the Social Security Death Index.  As a matter of interest, Bill, working as a consultant for the California Department of Health in the late 1960’s, was involved in setting up California’s first Marriage and Death Index System that this information came from, and that system was still being used until the late 1990’s.

The marriage and divorce information for Texas came from Texas indices found on the internet at WorldVitalRecords.com.  The marriages cover the years 1968 to 2003, and the divorces  1968 to 2001.  The Texas deaths were found on the internet at Rootsweb.com and cover the years 1964 to 1998.

It must be mentioned that the information shown in the book that was derived from the internet is skeletal in nature compared to that taken on site from the actual county records shown in the remainder of the book.  We have taken a great deal of pride in presenting as much information as can possibly be garnered from the actual records – not just information found in the indices, which is quite often what one finds on the internet.

The county records we concentrated on most were marriages, civil and criminal court cases, probates, births, deaths and military discharge recordings.  Conspicuously absent from this list are land records.  Even though we recognize the genealogical value of these records, we did not  include land records in our search because of the volume of this type record.  We also did not include court records from any of the lower courts.  Only cases from the Circuit Court (or called District Court in some jurisdictions) are reported.  Records in city courts and lower county courts are too voluminous and contain such things as minor (and some not so minor) traffic violations.  Not only does searching these records take an inordinate amount of time and book space, the maintenance of these records is inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another, and often is not even available.  However, the presence of JUDAYs and/or JUDYs  in a particular area can be determined from the records we have included in the book, and further research in a specific area may be performed if one desires.

The book is divided into three main sections.  The first section contains selected articles from local histories and newspapers (mostly obituaries).  These are copied verbatim, except in a few instances where we felt compelled to correct atrocious grammar (ours isn’t all that great either, but occasionally we had to interfere) or obvious errors in content.  These articles are presented chronologically by date of publication.  A good many family connections and a great deal of family and local history can be found in these articles.

The second section contains abstracts of county records from each county where we did research.  The states included in this book are shown above.  As mentioned above, if a county from the group indicated is missing it is because we did not find any JUDAY or JUDY recordings in that county.  Within each county we have presented marriage records first, Circuit Court records (both civil and criminal) next, then probate records, followed by birth records, death records and military discharge recordings.  Each group is in chronological order by date of occurrence or date of recording.  On occasion you will discover the same person married two or more times in the marriage records, then later in the book the person’s divorce in the court records.  Then, still later in the book his or her birth record.  Obviously, the birth occurred first, and the divorce actually happened between the two marriages that appeared earlier, but appears afterward because of our chosen grouping of the records.

The last section in the book is the full-name index.  Our index is, literally, an every-name index, and then some.  Every person in the book is indexed, including both the married name and pre-married name for brides.  That is, making the assumption that the time-honored custom of the bride taking the husband’s surname is adhered to.  We have also indexed the maiden and married names of women when both names are obvious.  Some examples:  On page 96 you will find that Ira JUDY married Dorothy May HAMMER.  We have indexed Dorothy May under both HAMMER and JUDY.  On page 72 you will see that Rhonda Elizabeth JUDAY married James J COOPER.  We have indexed Rhonda Elizabeth under both COOPER and JUDAY.  Rhonda’s mother, whose maiden name was CHENOWETH is indexed under both CHENOWETH and JUDAY

A few words need to be said about research at county courthouses.  First, the quality and content of county records vary widely from one jurisdiction to another, and also over time.  The early records are usually very brief – for example, early marriages might only show a bride, a groom and who married them.  Later marriages would list more genealogical data such as date and place of birth, etc.  An example of jurisdictional differences is a comparison of marriage records of  North Dakota and New Mexico with those of the other states.  In general, marriage records from most of the states researched included parental and birth information and some had detailed divorce information as well, whereas the North Dakota and New Mexico marriages were usually very brief.  The California marriage records, with the exception of Fresno County where we did on-site research, and Texas marriage records shown in this book are skeletal in nature as the information was garnered from the internet.  This is a clear example of on-site research as opposed to researching on the internet.

Secondly, on the subject of doing research in county courthouses, a researcher is totally at the mercy of the personnel working in the various courthouses.  Some counties have personnel who are both knowledgeable and helpful, while other counties have clerks who are neither.  Thankfully, the norm is usually the former.  We have been in courthouses that were so enjoyable that we hated to leave, and others where we were sorry we ever went.  On a few instances we were denied access to records,  sometimes for valid legal reasons, other times because of a misinterpretation of a law or clerk indifference, and occasionally because the record in question could not be found.  We have indicated in the book those instances where we have found a record in the indices, but could  not locate the actual record.  In some South Dakota counties court records were available only for a fee. We look at so many public records that the cost would be prohibitive if we had to pay to see them all.  Consequently, it is our policy that we do not pay to see records that are supposed to be public.  Once again, we have indicated those records in the book.  The bottom line is that research in county courthouses is an adventure, and this adventure is reflected in the contents of this book.

While on the subject of researching county records, or research of any kind for that matter, quite often the records are handwritten, and not always easy to decipher.  We have tried to translate these various attempts at penmanship the best that we can, but can assure you that we have been far from 100% accurate in this undertaking.  It is also worth mentioning that the same name will quite often appear differently on the same document – both on handwritten and printed documents for that matter.  Some examples of different spelling of the same surname we encountered are   McGILLIVARY-McGILLVRAY, DREESEN-DREESSEN-DRESSEN and CADWALADER-CADWALLADER.  It was obvious to us that these names belonged to the same family, sometimes the same person, but we didn’t know which was correct.  At all times we have done the best we could in deciphering and reporting what we have seen.

The source material in courthouse records is sometimes in error, and other times difficult to interpret.  There is also the case where we have introduced errors in the transcription of the data, though we have made every attempt to minimize this type error.  Some of the records list a great deal of useful information, others hardly any.  We have attempted to report all the information contained in the original records.  Some of the court records are subject to individual interpretation.  We are not attorneys, and have attempted to only summarize the content of the court cases.  Any person interested in more detail on these cases may find the case files available to the public at the indicated county by requesting the indicated case number.

As mentioned above, we have done a great deal of research on family names.  A full list of all our published research efforts may be seen at http://www.baseballundertaker.com, and our books may be purchased through that website.  This is our fourth, and final,  JUDAY/JUDY publication, JUDAY and JUDY in the Pacific Northwest and JUDAY and JUDY in Indiana, JUDAY and JUDY in Missouri and parts of Colorado, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Ohio and Oklahoma mentioned  above, being the others.

Finally, we want to thank the many people who have helped make this book possible.  First has to be the many fine citizens of the Western States we traveled who provided services to us during our travels.  Those people include RV park proprietors and employees, service station operators, restaurateurs, and, in general, all the fantastic people we had the privilege of coming in contact with.  And we thank all the personnel at the county courthouses who were most helpful, and even those few who were not quite as helpful, as well.  It is to this group of people we have entrusted the care of our county records.  These records are probably the most precious gift of one generation to another.

                                                                                                                  Bill and LaVonne Lee
                                                                                                                  November 2007

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JUDAY and JUDY
in
Indiana

Compiled and prepared by Bill and LaVonne Lee.

160 pages, double-columned, full-name index, softcover (8 1/2 X 11) 2005.
ISBN-13:  978-0-9795830-4-9.
ISBN-10:  0-9795830-4-7.


David JUDAY was among the earliest settlers in Elkhart county, Indiana, and was the first JUDAY there, arriving in 1832.  His father, Henry JUDAY, followed David to Elkhart County, from Preble County, Ohio,  in 1836, bringing David's younger brothers, John, Baltzer and Adam.  Other children of Henry arrived shortly thereafter, forming the foundation of the JUDAY family that still live in Elkhart and surrounding Northern Indiana counties today.

The JUDY name covered in this book, although not as numerous as the JUDAYs, are spread over a larger area.  The first notice of a JUDY is in Dubois County in 1849 and in Wabash County in 1850.  Benjamin JUDY settled in Warren County in 1851, and his brother, Skillman, moved there in 1868.  Descendants of this family are not to be found in the area today, but Skillman's son, John F JUDY, became one of Indiana's wealthiest  and best-known men from 1890 until 1920.

Stories of these families, and hundreds of other JUDAYs and JUDYs can be found in JUDAY and JUDY in Indiana.  The book contains articles about the families taken from local histories and newspaper articles that reveal many family connections and a great deal of family and local history.  Inscriptions from JUDY and JUDAY tombstones taken in 36 Indiana cemeteries also help fill in missing links in your own personal family history.  Listings from today's telephone directories show where members of these families are living and can be reached today.

The County Records Section of the book contains 98 pages of thumbnail sketches from more than 1200 county records, taken directly from the records themselves and showing abbreviated detail of the contents of these public records.  Records included are marriage, civil and criminal court, probate court, birth, death and military discharge recordings.  These records fill in a great deal of the Who, What, Where and When questions.  The counties where we searched for every occurrence of the subject names were Brown, Carroll, Dubois, Elkhart, Fountain, Henry, Huntington, Kosciusko, Lake, Noble, Parke, Vermillion, Wabash, Warren, Wayne and Whitley.  Records from some other counties are included, but we did not perform an exhaustive search in any but the counties listed above.  Also, we did not find JUDY and/or JUDAY records in all the counties in which we searched.

There is lots of detail in this book, including information on some notables, as well as some bizarre happenings as well.  The rags to riches and back to rags story of John F JUDY, mentioned above, is told.  There is an unsolved  murder, a tragic murder suicide, as well as several accidental deaths.

Every name in this book is indexed - over 4000 names, including more than 1000 JUDAYs and nearly 900 JUDYs.

JUDAY and JUDY in Indiana is a MUST for the serious JUDAY and/or JUDY researcher.  Be sure to advise other JUDAY/JUDY researchers who would benefit from this informative book, and keep in mind that the book would make an outstanding gift for any JUDY or JUDAY family tree researcher.

The cost of JUDAY and JUDY in Indiana is $26.95, including shipping and handling.

SOLD OUT

NOTICE:  ALTHOUGH ALL COPIES OF THIS BOOK HAVE BEEN SOLD OUT, A GREAT DEAL OF JUDAY INFORMATION FROM THE RESEARCH THAT WENT INTO THE BOOK CAN BE FOUND AT FODGERelations.com.

AS ALWAYS, MANY THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST IN OUR RESEARCH, AND MAY YOUR SEARCHES BE FRUITFUL AND REWARDING.

                                                                                                                      BILL and LaVONNE LEE


Introduction To

JUDAY and JUDY
in
Indiana

Matilda JUDAY, born 15 September, 1844, in Elkhart County, Indiana, was one of LaVonne's great-grandmothers on her mother's side of the family.  In 1987 we began traveling from county to county through-out the Western United States, doing research on a number of family names, JUDAY among them.  It soon became evident that the names JUDAY and JUDY were often interchanged for each other, so we quickly expanded the scope of their search to include both names.  This book deals with information found about the JUDY and JUDAY families in county court-houses, libraries and directories during the summers of 1992 and 1993 in the State of Indiana. An earlier book, JUDAY and JUDY in the Pacific Northwest deals with records related to the two names from the states of Idaho, Oregon and Washington, found by us during the Summer of 1988.  This book can be found in many libraries and may be purchased directly from us. We plan on publishing the results of our research findings from over 800 county courthouses in the Western United States in the future, as time permits.

Time and resources did not allow us to search the records in all of Indiana's 92 counties.  The counties where we did perform extensive searches were Brown, Carroll, Dubois, Elkhart, Fountain, Henry, Huntington, Kosciusko, Lake, Noble, Parke, Vermillion, Wabash, Warren, Wayne and Whitley.  There are other counties included in the book, but information on those counties came mostly from sources found in libraries instead of from an extensive search of courthouse records.  The county records we concentrated on most were marriages, civil and criminal court cases, probates, births, deaths and military discharge recordings.  Conspicuously absent from this list are land records.  Even though we recognize the genealogical value of these records, we did not include land records in the book because of the volume of this type record.  We also did not include court records from any of the lower courts.  Only cases from the Circuit and Superior courts are included. Records in city courts and lower county courts are too voluminous and contain such things as minor (and some not so minor) traffic violations.  Not only does searching these records take an inordinate amount of time and book space, the maintenance of these records is inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another, and are often not available.  However, the presence of JUDAYs and/or JUDYs in a particular area can be determined from the records we have included, and further research in a specific area can be performed if one desires.

The book is divided into four main sections.  The first section contains selected articles from local histories and newspapers (mostly obituaries).  These are copied verbatim, except in a few instances where we felt compelled to correct atrocious grammar (ours isn't that perfect either, but occasionally we had to interfere) or obvious errors in content.  These articles are presented chronologically by date of publication.  A good many family connections and a great deal of family and local history can be found in these articles. At the end of this first section is a list of tombstone inscriptions for JUDAY, JUDY and some related families from cemeteries in the surrounding areas.  We have visited most of these cemeteries at one time or the other, and personally observed a good number of the inscriptions, but most of those shown came from publications found in libraries, and published by local genealogists who have walked the various cemeteries.

The second section contains abstracts of county records from each county where we did research, along with some entries from a few counties that were found in libraries.  This section is in order alphabetically by county.  Within each county we have presented marriage records first, civil and criminal court records next, followed by probate records, then birth records, death records, and finally, military discharge recordings.  Each group is in chronological order by date of occurrence or date of recording.  On occasion you will discover the same person married two or more times in the marriage records, then later in the book, the person's divorce in the court records.  Then, still later in the book, his or her birth record.  Obviously, the birth occurred first, and the divorce actually happened between the two marriages that appeared earlier, but appears afterward because of the grouping of the records.
 
The next section in the book contains directory information - street address and phone number of JUDAYs and JUDYs living in Indiana. We make no claim that these names include every JUDY or JUDAY living in the state, or that the names, addresses or phone numbers are current.  We only hope that the listings, which were taken from switchboard.com on the internet, are relatively accurate. This section is presented alphabetically by name within city.

The last section in the book is the full-name index.  Our index is, literally, an every name index, and then some.  Every person in the book is indexed, including both the married name and pre-married name for brides, making the assumption that the bride has followed the old-fashion custom of taking the husband's surname.  We have also indexed the maiden and married names of those women where both names are obvious.  Some examples - John F JUDY married Matilda HUNTER.  We have indexed Matilda under both JUDY and HUNTER.  Jennie JUDAY married John STOTTS.  Jennie is indexed under both JUDAY and STOTTS.  Wesley E OTT's parents were David OTT and Sarah HAPNER.  Sarah is indexed under both HAPNER and OTT. 

A few words need to be said about research at county courthouses.  First, a researcher is totally at the mercy of the personnel working in the various courthouses.  Some counties have personnel who are both knowledgeable and helpful, while other counties have personnel who are neither.  The norm is somewhere between these two extremes.  We have been in courthouses that were so enjoyable that we hated to leave, and in others where we were sorry we ever went.  Research of our public records is a challenge!  Secondly, the quality and content of county records vary widely from one jurisdiction to another and also over time.  In general, the counties included in this book had reasonably good records, but a marked difference can be seen in the content of marriage records from the earlier times to more recent times.  In a few cases we were denied access to records, some for valid legal reasons, others because of misinterpretation of a law or clerk indifference, or sometimes because the record in question could not be found.  These are indicated in the book.  One county in particular must be mentioned. Fountain County, Indiana, had one of the worst systems for their old court records that we have encountered in our many years of research. Record drawers were stacked one upon the other in a dark, damp cellar.  In no particular sequence, these records were rotting from the wet conditions.  The indices to these records were in good condition and the court personnel were great to work with, but once it was determined there was a court case from the indices, it was impossible to find the case file in the stack of decaying records in the cellar.  This can be seen in the book where "Could not find the Case File" is indicated.  Credit must be given to the court's personnel, however. They at least let us look.

We have made every effort to report the data as we saw it.  However, some of the source material is sometimes in error, and other times difficult to interpret.  In some instances the same name is spelled differently on the same form, for instance JUDAY and JUDY.  It's easy to write JUDY for JUDAY when the person giving a clerk information says JUDY, and most of the JUDAYs pronounce their name JUDY.  In some cases it was obvious to us that the record said JUDY when it should have said JUDAY, or HEPNER when it should have been HAPNER, but, in most instances, we are reporting what we SAW, NOT what we THOUGHT it should be.

There are also times where we have introduced errors in transcription of the data, although we have attempted to minimize this type error.  Some of the records list a great deal of information, others very little.  We have attempted to report all the information contained in the original records.  Some of the court records are subject to individual interpretation.  We are not attorneys, and have only attempted to summarize the content of the court cases.  Any individual interested in more detail on any of these cases may find the case files available to the public(?) at the indicated county courthouse by requesting the specified case number.

As mentioned above, we have done a great deal of research on family names that have a connection to LaVonne's family.  The names on her mother's side of the family, and consequently, those related to the JUDAYs are HAPNER, OTT and HOSHAW.  We have a great deal of information on these names and have the books
JUDAY and JUDY in the Pacific Northwest, HAPNER in the West and HOSHAW and HUSHAW in the West available.  We are currently working on OTT in Indiana, and more JUDAY and JUDY books.  Anyone interested in these names should not hesitate to let us know and we will keep you informed of our progress on these exciting projects.  In the meantime, we thank you for your interest in our publications.  Please let others know about us and our work.

Finally, we want to thank the many people who have helped make this book possible.  First has to be the many fine citizens in the fine State of Indiana who provided services to us during our travels.  Those people include RV park proprietors and employees, service station operators, restaurateurs, and, in general, all the fantastic people we had the privilege of coming in contact with.  And we thank all the personnel at the county courthouses who were most helpful, and even those who were not quite as helpful, as well. It is to this group of people we have entrusted the care of our county records. These records are probably the most precious gift of one generation to another.

                                                                                                Bill and LaVonne Lee
                                                                                                April, 2005

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JUDAY and JUDY in Missouri
and parts of
Colorado, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Ohio and Oklahoma

Compiled and prepared by Bill and LaVonne Lee.

95 pages, double-columned, full-name index, softcover (8 1/2 X 11) 2007.
ISBN-13:  978-0-9795830-7-0.
ISBN-10:  0-9795830-7-1.

From 1987 and 1996 Bill and LaVonne Lee visited nearly 800 county courthouses between Ohio and the Pacific Ocean, gathering information from courthouse records on the names JUDAY and JUDY.  They are presenting the results of this research in a series of informative books to be used by serious researchers of these two names.  JUDAY and JUDY in Missouri and parts of Colorado, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Ohio and Oklahoma is the third of this series, with more to come shortly.  JUDAY and JUDY in the Pacific Northwest, published in 1989, and JUDAY and JUDY in Indiana, published in 2005, are the other two.

The book contains articles about the families taken from local histories and newspaper articles that reveal many family connections and a great deal of family and local history.  The County Records Section of the book contains 63 pages of abstracts from more than 1100 county records, taken directly from the records themselves and showing abbreviated detail of the contents of these public records.  Records included are over 650 marriage records, nearly 200 civil and criminal court records, over 150 probate court records, more than 100 birth and death records and a smattering of military discharge recordings.  Every name in this book is indexed - over 3400 names, including more than 1000 JUDYs and nearly 200 JUDAYs.  These records answer a great number of the Who, What, Where and When questions.  A list of the counties researched is given in the Introduction to the book, a copy of which is below.

JUDAY and JUDY in Missouri and parts of Colorado, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Ohio and Oklahoma  is a MUST for the serious JUDAY and/or JUDY researcher.  Be sure to advise other JUDAY/JUDY researchers who would benefit from this informative book, and keep in mind that the book would make an outstanding gift for any JUDY or JUDAY family tree researcher.

The cost of JUDAY and JUDY in Missouri, and parts of Colorado, Iowa, Illinois,. Kansas, Ohio and Oklahoma  is $19.95, including shipping and handling.

SOLD OUT

NOTICE:  ALTHOUGH ALL COPIES OF THIS BOOK HAVE BEEN SOLD OUT, A GREAT DEAL OF JUDAY INFORMATION FROM THE RESEARCH THAT WENT INTO THE BOOK CAN BE FOUND AT FODGERelations.com.

AS ALWAYS, MANY THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST IN OUR RESEARCH, AND MAY YOUR SEARCHES BE FRUITFUL AND REWARDING.

                                                                                                                      BILL and LaVONNE LEE


Introduction To

JUDAY and JUDY in Missouri
and parts of
Colorado, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Ohio and Oklahoma

One of LaVonne Lee's  maternal grandmothers  was a JUDAY.  From 1988 to 1996 we traveled from county to county throughout the Western States doing research on a number of family names, JUDAY among them.  Because of the similarities in the names JUDAY and JUDY (a good number of the JUDAYs pronounce their name JUDY)  we also  gathered  data  on  that  name  as  well.   The end result has been a great deal of information gathered on the JUDAY and JUDY surnames.  Wishing to share this information with others who are interested in the history of JUDYs and/or JUDAYs we have prepared three books (with more to come in the future) at this time detailing our findings.  JUDAY and JUDY in the Pacific Northwest  was completed in 1989 and includes the results of our research in Idaho, Oregon and Washington.  JUDAY and JUDY in Indiana was completed in 2005 and includes results of our research from selected Indiana counties.  JUDAY and JUDY in Missouri and parts of Colorado, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Ohio and Oklahoma reports our findings from each of Missouri’s 114 counties plus St Louis City, and selected counties in the other states listed in the title.  These books can be found in many libraries and may be purchased directly from us at our website, http://www.baseballundertaker.com/juday.html.

This book contains selected articles of interest on the JUDAY and JUDY names from the states indicated above, and abstracts of county records, described below.  We searched the indices of county courthouse records in every county, plus St Louis City, in the state of Missouri.  If a  county from Missouri is missing in the book it is because we did not find any indexed records for the subject names in the missing county.

Our Colorado research was very abbreviated, resulting in a solitary marriage record from Otero County, and covered Baca, Bent, Crowley, Otero and Prowers counties.  In Iowa we only researched in Hamilton, Harrison, Mills and Webster counties, but had slightly better results, finding both a few JUDAYs and JUDYs.  Pike County in Illinois resulted in a hand full of JUDY records.  In Illinois we also checked for the two names in Calhoun County, but found nothing.  We visited every Kansas county, but did not begin looking for JUDAY/JUDYs  until late in our search there, and then only looked for marriage records.  We found a good number of marriage records there, but they only represent the eastern part of Kansas, and most of them were JUDYs – only a few JUDAYs.

In Ohio we researched only one county, Preble County, and what a wealth of information we found.  There are a goodly number of both JUDAYs and JUDYs, but most of them are probably from the JUDAY side of the family as the same person will, on occasion, be referred to as both JUDAY and JUDY on the same document.  We searched all that was available in marriages, probates, births and deaths, but did not have adequate time there to really do justice (no pun intended) to civil and criminal court records.  Our Oklahoma research covered only the  counties along the northern border including Alfalfa, Beaver, Cimarron, Craig, Delaware, Grant, Harper, Kay, Mayes, Nowata, Osage, Ottawa, Rogers, Texas, Tulsa, Washington and Woods counties.  Once again, if one of those counties is missing in the book, it is because we found nothing of  interest on our  names there, but some Oklahoma counties provided some good JUDY information.

The county records we concentrated on most were marriages, civil and criminal court cases, probates, births, deaths and military discharge recordings.  Conspicuously absent from this list are land records.  Even though we recognize the genealogical value of these records, we did not  include land records in our search because of the volume of this type record.  We also did not include court records from any of the lower courts.  Only cases from the Circuit Court (or called District Court in some jurisdictions)  are reported.  Records in city courts and lower county courts are too voluminous and contain such things as minor (and some not so minor) traffic violations. Even Title Max does not consider a driver's minor traffic violations as grounds for denial of a Title Max loan.   Also, searching these records take an inordinate amount of time and book space, the maintenance of these records is inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another, and often is not even available.  However, the presence of JUDAYs and/or JUDYs  in a particular area can be determined from the records we have included in the book, and further research in a specific area may be performed if one desires.

The book is divided into three main sections.  The first section contains selected articles from local histories and newspapers (mostly obituaries).  These are copied verbatim, except in a few instances where we felt compelled to correct atrocious grammar (ours isn’t all that great either, but occasionally we had to interfere) or obvious errors in content.  These articles are presented chronologically by date of publication.  A good many family connections and a great deal of family and local history can be found in these articles.

The second section contains abstracts of county records from each county where we did research.  The counties included in this book are shown above.  As mentioned above, if a county from the group indicated is missing it is because we did not find any JUDAY or JUDY recordings in that county.  Within each county we have presented marriage records first, Circuit Court records (both civil and criminal) next, then probate records, followed by birth records, death records and military discharge recordings.  Each group is in chronological order by date of occurrence or date of recording.  On occasion you will discover the same person married two or more times in the marriage records, then later in the book the person’s divorce in the court records.  Then, still later in the book his or her birth record.  Obviously, the birth occurred first, and the divorce actually happened between the two marriages that appeared earlier, but appears afterward because of our chosen grouping of the records.

The last section in the book is the full-name index.  Our index is, literally, an every-name index, and then some.  Every person in the book is indexed, including both the married name and pre-married name for brides.  That is, making the assumption that the time-honored custom of the bride taking the husband’s surname is adhered to.  We have also indexed the maiden and married names of women when both names are obvious.  Some examples:  On page 48 you will find that John JUDY married Elizabeth FINLEY.  We have indexed Elizabeth under both FINLEY and JUDY.  On page 67 you will see that Carrie JUDAY married George C ALBIN.  We have indexed Carrie under both ALBIN and JUDAY.  Carrie’s mother, whose maiden name was CLINE is indexed under both CLINE and JUDAY.

A few words need to be said about research at county courthouses.  First, the quality and content of county records vary widely from one jurisdiction to another, and also over time.  The early records are usually very brief – for example, early marriages might only show a bride, a groom and who married them.  Later marriages would list more genealogical data such as date and place of birth, etc.  An example of jurisdictional differences is a comparison of marriage records of Ohio and Missouri.  In general, Ohio marriage records, after the very early days, contained a great deal more data than Missouri records did.

Secondly, on the subject of doing research in county courthouses, a researcher is totally at the mercy of the personnel working in the various courthouses.  Some counties have personnel who are both knowledgeable and helpful, while other counties have clerks who are neither.  Thankfully, the norm is usually the former.  We have been in courthouses that were so enjoyable that we hated to leave, and others where we were sorry we ever went.  On a few instances we were denied access to records,  sometimes for valid legal reasons, other times because of a misinterpretation of a law or clerk indifference, and occasionally because the record in question could not be found.  This is the case in some of the larger Missouri counties.  In Jackson County, in particular, a good many court records have been lost, destroyed or sent to the State Archives in Jefferson City.  We have indicated in the book those instances where we have found a record in the indices, but could  not locate the actual record.  In St Louis City we did not even attempt to look at civil/criminal court records.  The reaction of the clerk when we asked to look at indices told us that was not a place we wanted to go.  Cooper County in Missouri needs special mention.  We found a goodly number of JUDYs living there over the years, but when we asked to look at specific probate records we were told that they were available only on Fridays (we were there on a Wednesday), and then only for a fee.  We look at so many public records that the cost would be prohibitive if we had to pay to see them all.  Consequently, it is our policy that we do not pay to see records that are supposed to be public.  Once again, we have indicated those records in the book for those who happen to be in Boonville MO on a Friday and are willing to pay for them.  The bottom line is that research in county courthouses is an adventure, and this adventure is reflected in the contents of this book.

While on the subject of researching county records, or research of any kind for that matter, quite often the records are handwritten, and not always easy to decipher.  We have tried to translate these various attempts at penmanship the best that we can, but can assure you that we have been far from 100% accurate in this undertaking.  It is also worth mentioning that the same name will quite often appear differently on the same document – both on handwritten and printed documents for that matter.  At all times we have done the best we could in deciphering and reporting what we have seen.

The source material in courthouse records is sometimes in error, and other times difficult to interpret.  There is also the case where we have introduced errors in the transcription of the data, though we have made every attempt to minimize this type error.  Some of the records list a great deal of useful information, others hardly any.  We have attempted to report all the information contained in the original records.  Some of the court records are subject to individual interpretation.  We are not attorneys, and have attempted to only summarize the content of the court cases.  Any person interested in more detail on these cases may find the case files available to the public at the indicated county by requesting the indicated case number.

As mentioned above, we have done a great deal of research on family names.  A full list of all our published research efforts may be seen at http://www.baseballundertaker.com, and our books may be purchased through that website.  This is our third JUDAY/JUDY publication, JUDAY and JUDY in the Pacific Northwest and JUDAY and JUDY in Indiana, described above, being the others.

Finally, we want to thank the many people who have helped make this book possible.  First has to be the many fine citizens of the Western States we traveled who provided services to us during our travels.  Those people include RV park proprietors and employees, service station operators, restaurateurs, and, in general, all the fantastic people we had the privilege of coming in contact with.  And we thank all the personnel at the county courthouses who were most helpful, and even those few who were not quite as helpful, as well.  It is to this group of people we have entrusted the care of our county records.  These records are probably the most precious gift of one generation to another.

                                                                                                                                Bill and LaVonne Lee
                                                                                                                                July 2007

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JUDAY and JUDY
in the
Pacific Northwest

Compiled and prepared by Bill and LaVonne Lee.

78 pages, double-columned, full-name index, softcover (8 1/2 X 11) 1989.


During 1988 and 1989 LaVonne and Bill visited every county courthouse in the states of Washington, Oregon and Idaho, gathering information on the JUDAY and JUDY surnames.  The end result of this research is JUDAY and JUDY in the Pacific Northwest, an informative book containing thumbnail sketches of all county courthouse  records found for the subject names in the three-state area.

In some cases one will be able to follow a single family through four generations in this three-state area. The book has detailed information on more than 800 public records including marriages, civil and criminal court cases, probates, deaths, military discharge recordings, directory listings and interesting articles from newspapers and local histories. The information reported covers the period from 1847 until 1989. Every name in this easy-to-reference book is indexed - more than 3000 names involved with the JUDAYs or JUDYs, including over 900 JUDYs and nearly 100 JUDAYs.

Be sure to advise other JUDAY/JUDY researchers who would like to benefit from this informative book,  and keep  in mind that  JUDAY and JUDY in the Pacific Northwest  would  make an outstanding gift for any JUDY or JUDAY family tree researcher.

The cost of JUDAY and JUDY in the Pacific Northwest is $17.95, including shipping and handling.  You may order directly from the Lee's by clicking Order Form,  printing and completing the form, and sending with a check or money order to:

Bill Lee
22886 Respite Lane
Foley AL 36535

Do not send cash. International and Canadian customers:  Please pay in U.S. funds.

SOLD OUT

NOTICE:  ALTHOUGH ALL COPIES OF THIS BOOK HAVE BEEN SOLD OUT, A GREAT DEAL OF JUDAY INFORMATION FROM THE RESEARCH THAT WENT INTO THE BOOK CAN BE FOUND AT FODGERelations.com.

AS ALWAYS, MANY THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST IN OUR RESEARCH, AND MAY YOUR SEARCHES BE FRUITFUL AND REWARDING.

                                                                                                                      BILL and LaVONNE LEE


RELATED  WEBSITES

FODGERelations.com.

JUDAY Genealogy and Family History at Ancestry.com.

JUDY Genealogy and Family History at Ancestry.com.

JUDY Research by Ken Judy.

JUDAY Genealogy and Family History at mycinnamontoast.com.

JUDY Genealogy and Family History at mycinnamontoast.com.

JUDAY Cemetery Records at Findagrave.com.

JUDY Cemetery Records at Findagrave.com.

JUDAY at Genealogy Today.

JUDY at Genealogy Today.

JUDAY Queries at CousinConnect.com.

JUDY Queries at CousinConnect.com.

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