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THE KNOOP and KNOPF Books

The four W's of family  history are Who were they? What did they do?  When and Where did they do it? These four W's are covered in detail for the KNOOP and KNOPF surnames in the books described below.  These books are not family histories, as such, for any specific KNOOP or KNOPF family, but most assuredly could provide some missing links to your special family history for either of these two names, or related families.  These books are the next best thing to going to hundreds of county courthouses in eighteen Western states to research the records yourself.

 LaVonne Lee's  paternal  grandmother  was a KNOOP.  Between 1987 and 1996 she and her husband, Bill Lee, traveled from county to county in eighteen Western states doing research on a number of family names, KNOOP among them.  Someone told the Lee's that the KNOOP name was derived   from  a   Dutch name,  KNOPF,  so  they  also  gathered  data  on  that  name  as  well.   Another  likely  related  name is KNOPP, but the occurrence of this name in the records is so frequent that the Lee's chose not to include it in their research.  The end result has been a great deal of information gathered on the KNOOP and KNOPF surnames.   Wishing to share this information with others who are interested in the history of KNOPFs and/or KNOOPs they prepared these books and are now offering them to the public.
 

KNOOP and KNOPF in MISSOURI

and parts of IOWA, INDIANA and OHIO

Compiled and prepared by Bill and LaVonne Lee.

74 pages, double-columned, every-name index, softcover (8 1/2 X 11) 2007.
ISBN-13: 
978-0-9795830-5-6.
ISBN-10:  0-9795830-5-5.

 
During the mid-1990s the Lee's visited each of the county courthouses in the state of Missouri, and selected county courthouses in the states of Indiana, Iowa and Ohio, gathering information on the KNOOP and KNOPF surnames.  The end result of this research effort is the book KNOOP and KNOPF in MISSOURI and parts of IOWA, INDIANA and OHIO.  The information reported covers the period from the late eighteenth century to 1996 - over 200 years.  In some cases it is possible to follow a family through eight generations in these states, from birth to marriage and court engagements through to death and probate.  This easy-to-reference book includes thumbnail sketches of over five hundred public records including marriages, civil and criminal court cases, probates, military discharge recordings and interesting articles from local histories and newspapers.   The 500+ public records reported include over 300 marriages, nearly 100 civil/criminal court cases, almost 100 probates and over 50 other type recordings.  Every name  in this  book is indexed - over 2000 names  involved in  some way with the KNOOPs or KNOPFs, including nearly 500 KNOOPs and 300 KNOPFs.
 
Be sure to advise other KNOOP/KNOPF researchers who would like to benefit from this informative book, and keep in mind that KNOOP and KNOPF in MISSOURI and parts of IOWA, INDIANA and OHIO would make an outstanding gift for any KNOOP or KNOPF family tree climber.

The cost of KNOOP and KNOPF in MISSOURI and parts of IOWA, INDIANA and OHIO is $17.95,  including shipping and handling.

SOLD OUT

NOTICE:  ALTHOUGH ALL COPIES OF THIS BOOK HAVE BEEN SOLD OUT, A GREAT DEAL OF KNOOP INFORMATION FROM THE RESEARCH THAT WENT INTO THE BOOK CAN BE FOUND AT FODGERelations.com.

AS ALWAYS, MANY THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST IN OUR RESEARCH, AND MAY YOUR SEARCHES BE FRUITFUL AND REWARDING.

                                                                                                                      BILL and LaVONNE LEE
 


Introduction to

KNOOP and KNOPF in MISSOURI

and parts of IOWA, INDIANA and OHIO

LaVonne Lee's  paternal  grandmother  was a KNOOP.  From 1988 to 1996 we traveled from county to county throughout the Western States doing research on a number of family names, KNOOP among them.  Someone told us that the KNOOP name was derived   from  a   Dutch name,  KNOPF,  so  we also  gathered  data  on  that  name  as  well.   Another  likely  related  name is KNOPP, but the occurrence of this name in the records is so frequent that we chose not to include it in their research.  The end result has been a great deal of information gathered on the KNOOP and KNOPF surnames.  Wishing to share this information with others who are interested in the history of KNOPFs and/or KNOOPs we have prepared three books detailing our findings.  KNOOP and KNOPF in the Pacific Northwest  was completed in 1989 and includes the results of our research in Idaho, Oregon and Washington.  KNOOP and KNOPF in the WEST is in process, to be completed soon, and will include our findings in Arizona, Montana, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nevada, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming, and parts of California, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas.  These books can be found in many libraries and may be purchased directly from us at our website, http://www.baseballundertaker.com/knoop.html.

KNOOP and KNOPF in Missouri and parts of Iowa, Indiana and Ohio, contains selected articles of interest on the KNOOP and KNOPF names from the states indicated in the book title, and abstracts of county records, described below.  We searched the indices of county courthouse records in every Missouri county.  If a Missouri county is missing from the book, it is because we did not find any indexed records for the subject names in the missing county.  Our Indiana research included only the counties of Brown, Carroll, Dubois, Elkhart, Fountain, Henry, Huntington, Kosciusko, Lake, Noble, Parke, Vermillion, Wabash, Warren, Wayne and Whitley.  Once again, if one of those counties is missing in the book, it is because we found nothing of interest on our  names there.  There are fragmentary pieces of information from a few other Indiana counties, but we picked that up from various publications we found in libraries.  The research in Iowa is even more limited, including only Hamilton, Harrison, Mills and Webster counties.  Again, if one of those counties is missing, you know why.

The only Ohio county that we searched was Preble, and we found no KNOOP or KNOPF recordings there.  However, Miami County, Ohio, is just a short distance up the road from Preble County, and we didnít get there.  There is a wealth of KNOOP history to be found in Miami County and the surrounding area.  The KNOOPs were among the first white settlers in that part of Ohio in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century.  This is revealed in a good many local history articles we have discovered and, because of the historical content about the KNOOP family, and a direct connection to LaVonneís family, we have included them in this book.  Some contain repetitious material, but something different can be discovered in each article.  

The county records we concentrated on most were marriages, civil and criminal court cases, probates, births, deaths and military discharge recordings.  Conspicuously absent from this list are land records.  Even though we recognize the genealogical value of these records, we did not  include land records in our search because of the volume of this type record.  We also did not include court records from any of the lower courts.  Only cases from the Circuit Court  are reported.  Records in city courts and lower county courts are too voluminous and contain such things as minor (and some not so minor) traffic violations.  Not only does searching these records take an inordinate amount of time and book space, the maintenance of these records is inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another, and often is not even available.  However, the presence of KNOOPs and/or KNOPFs  in a particular area can be determined from the records we have included in the book, and further research in a specific area may be performed if one desires.

The book is divided into three main sections.  The first section contains selected articles from local histories and newspapers (mostly obituaries).  These are copied verbatim, except in a few instances where we felt compelled to correct atrocious grammar (ours isnít all that great either, but occasionally we had to interfere) on obvious errors in content.  These articles are presented chronologically by date of publication.  A good many family connections and a great deal of family and local history can be found in these articles.

The second section contains abstracts of county records from each county where we did research.  The counties included in this book are shown above.  As mentioned above, if a county from the group indicated is missing it is because we did not find any KNOOP or KNOPF recordings in that county.  Within each county we have presented marriage records first, Circuit Court records (both civil and criminal) next, then probate records, followed by birth records, death records and military discharge recordings.  Each group is in chronological order by date of occurrence or date of recording.  On occasion you will discover the same person married two or more times in the marriage records, then later in the book the personís divorce in the court records.  Then, still later in the book his or her birth record.  Obviously, the birth occurred first, and the divorce actually happened between the two marriages that appeared earlier, but appears afterward because of our chosen grouping of the records.

The last section in the book is the full-name index.  Our index is, literally, an every-name index, and then some.  Every person in the book is indexed, including both the married name and pre-married name for brides.  That is, making the assumption that the time-honored custom of the bride taking the husbandís surname is adhered to.  We have also indexed the maiden and married names of women when both names are obvious.  Some examples:  On page 27 you will find that Gene Arthur KNOPF married Mary Ann SKOOG.  We have indexed Mary Ann under both SKOOG and KNOPF.  Mary Annís mother, whose maiden name was Anna PEARSON, is indexed under both PEARSON and SKOOG.  On page 31 you will see that Donna Belle KNOOP married Melvin Leroy GALL.  We have indexed Donna Belle under both GALL and KNOOP.

A few words need to be said about research at county courthouses.  First, the quality and content of county records vary widely from one jurisdiction to another, and also over time.  The early records are usually very brief Ė for example, early marriages might only show a bride, a groom and who married them.  Later marriages would list more genealogical data such as date and place of birth, etc.  On jurisdictional differences, in general, later Indiana marriage records contained a great deal more data at an early date than Missouri records did. 

Secondly, on the subject of doing research in county courthouses, a researcher is totally at the mercy of the personnel working in the various courthouses.  Some counties have personnel who are both knowledgeable and helpful, while other counties have clerks who are neither.  Thankfully, the norm is usually the former.  We have been in courthouses that were so enjoyable that we hated to leave, and others where we were sorry we ever went.  We encountered one Missouri county where public probate records were only available to the public on a certain day of the week, and then only for a fee.  On a few instances we were denied access to records,  sometimes for valid legal reasons, other times because of a misinterpretation of a law or clerk indifference, and occasionally because the record in question could not be found.  These are indicated in the book.  The bottom line is that research in county courthouses is an adventure, and this adventure is reflected in the contents of this book.

While on the subject of researching county records, or research of any kind for that matter, quite often the records are handwritten, and not always easy to decipher.  We have tried to translate these various attempts at penmanship the best that we can, but can assure you that we have been far from 100% accurate in this undertaking.  It is also worth mentioning that the same name will quite often appear differently on the same document Ė both on handwritten and printed documents for that matter.  At all times we have done the best we could in deciphering and reporting what we have seen.

The source material in courthouse records is sometimes in error, and other times difficult to interpret.  There is also the case where we have introduced errors in the transcription of the data, though we have made every attempt to minimize this type error.  Some of the records list a great deal of useful information, others hardly any.  We have attempted to report all the information contained in the original records.  Some of the court records are subject to individual interpretation.  We are not attorneys, and have attempted to only summarize the content of the court cases.  Any person interested in more detail on these cases may find the case files available to the public at the indicated county by requesting the indicated case number.

As mentioned above, we have done a great deal of research on family names.  A full list of all our published research efforts may be seen at http://www.baseballundertaker.com, and our books may be purchased through that website.  This is our second KNOOP/KNOPF publication, with a third, and final one, KNOOP and KNOPF in the WEST, described above, currently in process and hopefully to be completed early next month.

Finally, we want to thank the many people who have helped make this book possible.  First has to be the many fine citizens of Indiana, Iowa and Missouri who provided services to us during our travels.  Those people include RV park proprietors and employees, service station operators, restaurateurs, and, in general, all the fantastic people we had the privilege of coming in contact with.  And we thank all the personnel at the county courthouses who were most helpful, and even those few who were not quite as helpful, as well.  It is to this group of people we have entrusted the care of our county records.  These records are probably the most precious gift of one generation to another. 

                                                                                                Bill and LaVonne Lee
                                                                                 August 2007

Return to Top


KNOOP and KNOPF in WEST

Includes Arizona, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico,

North and South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming

and parts of

California, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas

Compiled and prepared by Bill and LaVonne Lee.

94 pages, double-columned, full-name index, softcover (8 1/2 X 11) 2007.
ISBN-13: 
978-0-9795830-6-3.
ISBN-10:  0-9795830-6-3.

 
During the mid-1990s the Lee's visited each of the county courthouses in the states of Arizona, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North and South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming and selected county courthouses in the states of Kansas and Oklahoma, gathering information on the KNOOP and KNOPF surnames.  In more recent times they extracted limited information for those surnames from the internet for California and Texas.  The end result of this research effort is the book KNOOP and KNOPF in the WEST.  The information reported covers the period from the late nineteenth century to 2004 - nearly 120 years.  In some cases it is possible to follow a family through several generations in these states, from birth to marriage and court engagements through to death and probate.  It is also possible to discover lost family members who have wandered from the home place to find greener pastures elsewhere.  This easy-to-reference book includes thumbnail sketches of over a thousand public records including marriages, civil and criminal court cases, probates, birth and death records, military discharge recordings, and interesting articles from local histories and newspapers.   The 1042 public records reported include 544 marriages, 174 civil/criminal court cases, 53 probates, 57 birth records, 208 death records and a hand full of military discharge recordings.  Every name  in this  book is indexed - over 3500 names  involved in  some way with the KNOOPs or KNOPFs, including over 400 KNOOPs and 800 KNOPFs.
 
Be sure to advise other KNOOP/KNOPF researchers who would like to benefit from this informative book, and keep in mind that KNOOP and KNOPF in the WEST would make an outstanding gift for any KNOOP or KNOPF family tree climber.

The cost of KNOOP and KNOPF in the WEST is $19.95,  including shipping and handling.

SOLD OUT

NOTICE:  ALTHOUGH ALL COPIES OF THIS BOOK HAVE BEEN SOLD OUT, A GREAT DEAL OF KNOOP INFORMATION FROM THE RESEARCH THAT WENT INTO THE BOOK CAN BE FOUND AT FODGERelations.com.

AS ALWAYS, MANY THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST IN OUR RESEARCH, AND MAY YOUR SEARCHES BE FRUITFUL AND REWARDING.

                                                                                                                      BILL and LaVONNE LEE
 


Introduction to

KNOOP and KNOPF in the WEST

LaVonne Lee's  paternal  grandmother  was a KNOOP.  From 1988 to 1996 we traveled from county to county throughout the Western States doing research on a number of family names, KNOOP among them.  Someone told us that the KNOOP name was derived   from  a   Dutch name,  KNOPF,  so  we also  gathered  data  on  that  name  as  well.   Another  likely  related  name is KNOPP, but the occurrence of this name in the records is so frequent that we chose not to include it in their research.  The end result has been a great deal of information gathered on the KNOOP and KNOPF surnames.  Wishing to share this information with others who are interested in the history of KNOPFs and/or KNOOPs we have prepared three books detailing our findings.  KNOOP and KNOPF in the Pacific Northwest  was completed in 1989 and includes the results of our research in Idaho, Oregon and Washington.  KNOOP and KNOPF in Missouri and Parts of Iowa, Indiana and Ohio was completed last month.  KNOOP and KNOPF in the West  is the last of our KNOOP/KNOPF series and includes our findings in Arizona, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North and South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming, and parts of California, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas.  These books can be found in many libraries and may be purchased directly from us at our website, http://www.baseballundertaker.com/knoop.html.

KNOOP and KNOPF in the West, contains selected articles of interest on the KNOOP and KNOPF names from the states indicated above, and abstracts of county records, described below.  We searched the indices of county courthouse records in every county in the states of Arizona, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North and South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming.  If a  county from one of those states is missing in the book it is because we did not find any indexed records for the subject names in the missing county.  Our Oklahoma research covered only the  counties along the northern border including Alfalfa, Beaver, Cimarron, Craig, Delaware, Grant, Harper, Kay, Mayes, Nowata, Osage, Ottawa, Rogers, Texas, Washington and Woods counties.  Once again, if one of those counties is missing in the book, it is because we found nothing of  interest on our  names there.

Sorry to say, the county records gathered in Kansas are fragmentary, at best.  We did find some KNOOP/KNOPF information in Kansas, but that was early in our research experience, and our record keeping at that time was a work-in-process.  Regardless, we have included what information we picked up in Kansas, but rest assured that it is our feeling that a great deal more can be found there.

With the exception of Californiaís Fresno County, our California information was found either in libraries or on the internet.  We did do a thorough search of birth, marriage and death records (not civil, criminal or probate court records) in Fresno County.  The remainder of the California marriage records were taken from microfiche furnished by the California Department of Health and cover only the years of 1960 to 1985.  With the exception of Fresno County, the California death records also came from the California Department of Health, were found at Rootsweb.com and cover the years 1940 to 1997.  These were supplemented by information found on the Social Security Death Index.  As a matter of interest, Bill, working as a consultant for the California Department of Health in the late 1960ís, was involved in setting up Californiaís first Marriage and Death Index System that this information came from, and that system was still being used until the late 1990ís.

The marriage and divorce information for Texas came from Texas State indices found on the internet at WorldVitalRecords.com.  The marriages cover the years 1968 to 2003, and the divorces  1968 to 2001.  The Texas deaths were found on the internet at Rootsweb.com and cover the years 1964 to 1998.

It must be mentioned that the information shown in the book that was derived from the internet is skeletal in nature compared to that taken on site from the actual county records shown in the remainder of the book.  We have taken a great deal of pride in presenting as much information as can possibly be garnered from the actual records Ė not just information found in the indices, which is quite often what one finds on the internet.

Back to the records from counties where we looked at the actual records:  The county records we concentrated on most were marriages, civil and criminal court cases, probates, births, deaths and military discharge recordings.  Conspicuously absent from this list are land records.  Even though we recognize the genealogical value of these records, we did not  include land records in our search because of the volume of this type record.  We also did not include court records from any of the lower courts.  Only cases from the Circuit Court  are reported.  Records in city courts and lower county courts are too voluminous and contain such things as minor (and some not so minor) traffic violations.  Not only does searching these records take an inordinate amount of time and book space, the maintenance of these records is inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another, and often is not even available.  However, the presence of KNOOPs and/or KNOPFs  in a particular area can be determined from the records we have included in the book, and further research in a specific area may be performed if one desires.

The book is divided into three main sections.  The first section contains selected articles from local histories and newspapers (mostly obituaries).  These are copied verbatim, except in a few instances where we felt compelled to correct atrocious grammar (ours isnít all that great either, but occasionally we had to interfere) or obvious errors in content.  These articles are presented chronologically by date of publication.  A good many family connections and a great deal of family and local history can be found in these articles.

The second section contains abstracts of county records from each county where we did research.  The counties included in this book are shown above.  As mentioned above, if a county from the group indicated is missing it is because we did not find any KNOOP or KNOPF recordings in that county.  Within each county we have presented marriage records first, Circuit Court records (both civil and criminal) next, then probate records, followed by birth records, death records and military discharge recordings.  Each group is in chronological order by date of occurrence or date of recording.  On occasion you will discover the same person married two or more times in the marriage records, then later in the book the personís divorce in the court records.  Then, still later in the book his or her birth record.  Obviously, the birth occurred first, and the divorce actually happened between the two marriages that appeared earlier, but appears afterward because of our chosen grouping of the records.

The last section in the book is the full-name index.  Our index is, literally, an every-name index, and then some.  Every person in the book is indexed, including both the married name and pre-married name for brides.  That is, making the assumption that the time-honored custom of the bride taking the husbandís surname is adhered to.  We have also indexed the maiden and married names of women when both names are obvious.  Some examples:  On page 48 you will find that Richard KNOOP married Pat HECKATHORN.  We have indexed Pat under both HECKATHORN and KNOOP.  Patís mother, whose maiden name was Helen DENTON,  is indexed under both DENTON and HECKATHORN.  On page 55 you will see that Emma Lou KNOPF married Ollie Edward WARNER.  We have indexed Emma Lou under both WARNER and KNOPF.

A few words need to be said about research at county courthouses.  First, the quality and content of county records vary widely from one jurisdiction to another, and also over time.  The early records are usually very brief Ė for example, early marriages might only show a bride, a groom and who married them.  Later marriages would list more genealogical data such as date and place of birth, etc.  An example of jurisdictional differences is a comparison of marriage records of Nebraska and Arizona.  In general, Nebraska marriage records contained a great deal more data at an early date than Arizona records did.

Secondly, on the subject of doing research in county courthouses, a researcher is totally at the mercy of the personnel working in the various courthouses.  Some counties have personnel who are both knowledgeable and helpful, while other counties have clerks who are neither.  Thankfully, the norm is usually the former.  We have been in courthouses that were so enjoyable that we hated to leave, and others where we were sorry we ever went.  We encountered one Arizona county where we were not allowed to even look at indices to what are supposed to be public records.  On a few instances we were denied access to records,  sometimes for valid legal reasons, other times because of a misinterpretation of a law or clerk indifference, and occasionally because the record in question could not be found.  These are indicated in the book.  The bottom line is that research in county courthouses is an adventure, and this adventure is reflected in the contents of this book.

While on the subject of researching county records, or research of any kind for that matter, quite often the records are handwritten, and not always easy to decipher.  We have tried to translate these various attempts at penmanship the best that we can, but can assure you that we have been far from 100% accurate in this undertaking.  It is also worth mentioning that the same name will quite often appear differently on the same document Ė both on handwritten and printed documents for that matter.  At all times we have done the best we could in deciphering and reporting what we have seen.

The source material in courthouse records is sometimes in error, and other times difficult to interpret.  There is also the case where we have introduced errors in the transcription of the data, though we have made every attempt to minimize this type error.  Some of the records list a great deal of useful information, others hardly any.  We have attempted to report all the information contained in the original records.  Some of the court records are subject to individual interpretation.  We are not attorneys, and have attempted to only summarize the content of the court cases.  Any person interested in more detail on these cases may find the case files available to the public at the indicated county by requesting the indicated case number.

As mentioned above, we have done a great deal of research on family names.  A full list of all our published research efforts may be seen at http://www.baseballundertaker.com, and our books may be purchased through that website.  This is our third KNOOP/KNOPF publication, KNOOP and KNOPF in the Pacific Northwest and KNOOP and KNOPF in Missouri and Parts of Iowa, Indiana and Ohio, described above, being the others.

Finally, we want to thank the many people who have helped make this book possible.  First has to be the many fine citizens of the Western States we traveled who provided services to us during our travels.  Those people include RV park proprietors and employees, service station operators, restaurateurs, and, in general, all the fantastic people we had the privilege of coming in contact with.  And we thank all the personnel at the county courthouses who were most helpful, and even those few who were not quite as helpful, as well.  It is to this group of people we have entrusted the care of our county records.  These records are probably the most precious gift of one generation to another.

                                                                                                 Bill and LaVonne Lee
                                                                                                 November 2007

Return to Top


KNOOP and KNOPF
in the
Pacific Northwest

Compiled and prepared by Bill and LaVonne Lee. 

44 pages, double-columned, every-name index, softcover (8 1/2 X 11) 1989.

This book has detailed information on more than 400 public records including marriages, civil and criminal court cases, probates, deaths, military discharge recordings, directory listings and interesting articles from newspapers and local histories from the Pacific Northwest states of Idaho, Oregon and Washington.  Every name in this easy-to-reference book is indexed - more than 1600 names involved with the KNOOPs or KNOPFs, including nearly 500 KNOPFs and over 200 KNOOPs.

Be sure to advise any other KNOPF/KNOOP researchers who would like to benefit from this informative book, and keep in mind that KNOOP and KNOPF in the Pacific Northwest would make an outstanding gift for any KNOPF or KNOOP family tree researcher.

The cost of KNOOP and KNOPF in the Pacific Northwest is $14.95, including shipping and handling.
 
SOLD OUT

NOTICE:  ALTHOUGH ALL COPIES OF THIS BOOK HAVE BEEN SOLD OUT, A GREAT DEAL OF KNOOP INFORMATION FROM THE RESEARCH THAT WENT INTO THE BOOK CAN BE FOUND AT FODGERelations.com.

AS ALWAYS, MANY THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST IN OUR RESEARCH, AND MAY YOUR SEARCHES BE FRUITFUL AND REWARDING.

                                                                                                                      BILL and LaVONNE LEE
 


Introduction To

KNOOP and KNOPF
in the
Pacific Northwest

Neither the KNOOPs nor the KNOPFs can be included in what was the earliest settlement of the Pacific Northwest, but even so, the names enter the records in the mid to late nineteenth century.  The first KNOOP settler seems to have been a German immigrant, Charles KNOOP, who settled in Lane County, Oregon, in about 1885.  The earliest KNOOP record in this book is his marriage to Annie WINZENREID (correct spelling up for debate) in Lane County on 15 Dec 1888. William KNOOP, his wife, Capitola, and one year old son, Lauren, settled in Oregon City in 1902.  This family was responsible for a good many of the records cited in this book.  Through the years, other KNOOP families have moved to the northwest, and their records are included, also.

The related name of KNOPF also made its appearance in the records of the Pacific Northwest during the late nineteenth century.  A solitary death record for one, Edward C KNOPF, appears in Clallam County, Washington, during 1878.  The next appearance of a KNOPF record is a court case involving Charles and Fanny KNOPF in Pierce County, Washington, during 1899.  The relationship between the KNOPF and KNOOP names (or perhaps, confusion between the names) raises its head as a Charles KNOOP, whose wife was Frances (also called Fanny) was farming across the state, near Chattaroy, Washington, at about the same time, in 1899.  Charles KNOOP died in 1899, and Fanny in 1902.  Were Charles and Fanny KNOPF, who were involved in the court case in Pierce County, the same people as Charles and Fanny KNOOP, who farmed, then died, in Spokane County? Perhaps one of you readers knows the answer.

Other early KNOPFs in the records of the Pacific Northwest include a Tacoma tailor, Jacob KNOPF, and a Russian immigrant family that settled in Walla Walla, Washington, around the turn of the century.  This family, Conrad KNOPF, his wife, Marie, and their nine children (and then their offspring), make up a goodly number of the records in this book.

During the summers of 1988 and 1989, we gathered these records when we visited every one of the 119 county courthouses in the three-state area of Washington, Oregon and Idaho. We extracted any information we could find on the KNOOP and KNOPF names, locating over four hundred public records involving these families.  These records include marriages, civil and criminal court cases, probates, births, deaths, and military discharge recordings.  We did not look at land records because of the volume of this type data, and the specialized nature of these records.  However, the presence of KNOPFs or KNOOPs in a particular area can be determined from the records we did search, and further research in land ownership for a specific name can be performed if one desires.

In addition to county records, we also spent a period of time at the Idaho Historical Society Library in Boise ID, the Oregon Historical Society Library in Portland OR, and the Washington State Historical Society Library in Tacoma WA.  These libraries permit access to old newspapers, and to local histories.  We found two articles about KNOOPs, and have included these in the first section of the book.  Also included in this section are two stories about the Bill KNOOP family of Oregon City, as told to us by Bill KNOOP's daughter, Opal CHRISTENSEN, of Gladstone OR.

The second section of the book contains the extraction of records from each of the three states' county courthouses.  If a county is not included, it has been omitted only because we did not find any KNOOP or KNOPF recordings in that county.  Marriage records are listed first, then court cases (we only extracted information from the counties' higher court - District Court in Idaho, Circuit Court in Oregon, and Superior Court in Washington), probates, births, deaths, and military discharge recordings.  Each group of records is presented in order by date of occurrence, within record type, within county, within state.  The counties are listed in alphabetical order within state, with Idaho first, Oregon next, and Washington last (only because someone said I comes before O, which comes before W).

A few words need to be said about research at county courthouses.  First, a researcher is totally at the mercy of the personnel working in the various courthouses.  Some counties have personnel who are both knowledgeable and helpful, while other counties have personnel who are neither helpful nor knowledgeable.  The norm is somewhere between these two extremes.  Our experiences are generally around the norm, but we must take this opportunity to cite those which are both extremes from the norm.  We will start with the good news first. In general, the county systems, and the county personnel, in the State of Washington are the best we have encountered.  This statement is being made by researchers who have performed similar work in over 400 counties in eleven states during the past three years.  We want to especially commend Ms. Kathy MARTIN, the County Clerk of Walla Walla County, and Mr. Bill HARDY, the Chief Deputy County Clerk of Spokane County.  The record systems in these two counties are probably the best we have seen, and more important, the personnel were among the most helpful with which we have had the pleasure of working.

At the other end of the spectrum are the counties in which the systems were not so good, and the personnel not so helpful.  Although Washington was generally a good experience for us, two counties need to be mentioned as not being up to a par with their neighbors.  The systems in Okanogan County were not too slick, and the personnel did not even maintain a body temperature.  Sorry, but that is the way it was.  In Benton County we were not even allowed to look at court case indices, so our research does not include any court cases or probates from Benton County WA.  In all fairness to Benton County, the personnel responsible for marriage records were most helpful.  Three Idaho counties deserve special jeers.  We were not allowed to look at court case indices in Elmore County, even though they are public records.  In Nez Perce County, we were allowed to look at the indices to court cases and probates, but after spending half a day doing so, we were not allowed to look at the case files, which are likewise, public records.  In Boundary County we were allowed to look at the indices, but after finding a number of cases of interest, we were informed that the court personnel could not take the ten minutes it would have taken them to retrieve the case files for us.  Sometimes it seems as though the taxpaying public is there for the pleasure of our so-called public servants.

In general, the record systems of most Oregon counties seem to be in a state of transition between the pen and ink of the past, and present-day computer technology.  This transition is rather painful for local county personnel, and made our job more difficult than should have been necessary.  In some instances, local records were stored in at least three locations:  the local courthouse, a local (but off-site) storage area, and in the State Archives at Salem. Whenever possible, we went wherever we had to go in order to look at the available records - sometimes to all three locations for a single county.  The only Oregon counties where we could not see the public records we wanted to see were Josephine and Marion.  The records mentioned are noted in the sections for those two counties.

The final section of the book contains a list of KNOOPs and KNOPFs now living in the Pacific Northwest.  These names were mostly extracted from current telephone directories, and we make no claim to listing all KNOOPs and KNOPFs now in the three states.  We only hope the listings are relatively accurate.

To the best of our knowledge, every name in this book, with the exception of those in this introduction, is contained in the index.  Women's names have been indexed to her pre-marriage name as well as her married name.  For example, Ruth MINAKER, who married a KNOPF, is indexed under both KNOPF and MINAKER.  Likewise, Betty KNOOP, who married an ARMSTRONG, is indexed under both KNOOP and ARMSTRONG.

We have attempted to report the data as we found it.  It is somewhat obvious to us that Alvin and Elvin KNOPF is the same person, but we have reported the names as we found them, even though they are not always consistent.  Two surnames were especially confusing to us. MADDAX, MATTOX, or MADDOX. WINSENRIED or WINZENREID. Which are correct, if any of the above, we are not sure.  The important thing to note is that we attempted to report what we saw.  And sometimes, in the case of poor quality microfilm, or illegible scribbling on holographic documents, we were not always really sure of what we were seeing.

This is important enough to repeat:  We have made every effort to report the data as we thought we saw it.  However, some of the source material is sometimes in error, and other times difficult to interpret.  There is also the case where we have introduced errors in the transcription of the data, although we have attempted to minimize this type error.  Some of the records contain a great deal of information, others very little.  Contrasting examples would be the marriage records of Umatilla County, Oregon, where the marriage application is available, and the marriage records of King County, Washington, where they told us they have destroyed this valuable source of information.  The important thing to note is that we have attempted to report all the information contained in the original records we were allowed to see.  Some of the court records are subject to individual interpretation.  We are not attorneys, and have attempted to only summarize the content of the court cases.  Any individual interested in more detail on these cases may find the case files available to the public(?) at the indicated county by requesting the specified case number.

Finally, we want to thank the many people who have helped make this booklet possible.  First has to be the many fine citizens of the area who provided services for us during our six-months in the Pacific Northwest during the summers of 1988 and 1989.  Those people include RV park proprietors and employees, service station proprietors and employees, restaurateurs, market employees, and in general, every one of the fine Washingtonians, Oregonians and Idahoans to which we had the privilege of coming in contact.  The personnel at the Idaho Historical Society Library, the Oregon Historical Society Library, the Washington State Historical Society Library, and the Oregon State Archives were especially helpful, and deserve a special thanks.  And, we thank all the personnel at the county courthouses who were most helpful, and those who were not quite as helpful, as well.  It is to this group of people we have entrusted the care of our county records.  These records are probably the most precious gift of one generation to another.

                                                                                                    Bill and LaVonne Lee
                                                                                                    Smithfield, Utah
                                                                                                    November, 1989

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RELATED  WEBSITES

FODGERelations.com.

KNOOP Genealogy and Family History at Ancestry.com.

KNOPF Genealogy and Family History at Ancestry.com.

Visit Marc KNOOP's Website, a site dedicated to the KNOOP Family Name.

KNOOP Genealogy and Family History at mycinnamontoast.com.

KNOPF Genealogy and Family History at mycinnamontoast.com.

KNOOP Cemetery Records at Findagrave.com.

KNOPF Cemetery Records at Findagrave.com.


KNOOP at Genealogy Today.

KNOPF at Genealogy Today.


KNOOP Queries at CousinConnect.com.

KNOPF Queries at CousinConnect.com.

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