Bill & LaVonne Lee
Present
 

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The ZUMWALT Books
 
The four W's of family history are Who were they?  What did they do?  When and Where did they do it?  These four W's are covered in detail in the ZUMWALT books described below.  These books are not family histories, as such, for any specific ZUMWALT family, but most assuredly could provide some missing links to your special ZUMWALT, or related families.  This material was gathered by the Lee's during a ten-year search for information on this name.  These books are the next best thing to actually  going to each of hundreds  of county courthouses  to research the records yourself.

One of Bill Lee's great-great-grandmothers was a ZUMWALT.  In 1987 he and his wife, LaVonne, began traveling from county to county in the Western states doing research on a number of family names, ZUMWALT among them. The end result has been a great deal of information gathered on the ZUMWALT family. Wishing to share this information with others who are interested in the history of the ZUMWALTs, they have prepared the books described below and are now offering them to the public.
 

ZUMWALT

in parts of

 California and Texas

Compiled and prepared by Bill and LaVonne Lee.

78 pages, double-columned, every-name index, softcover (8 1/2 X 11) 2008
ISBN-13:  978-0-9818048-4-2
ISBN-10:  0-9818048-4-5.

This book is a detailed research aid for the ZUMWALT surname in the titled states. During the late 1980s and early to mid-1990s the Lee's visited county courthouses throughout the Western United States, including four counties in California and Texas, gathering information about the ZUMWALT family from courthouse records.  The end result has been a great deal of ZUMWALT data that has been put into these books.  This particular book contains abstracts from the four counties researched personally, plus information garnished from the internet, supplemented by information from the late Helynn Carrier’s exhaustive research effort, One ZUMWALT Family, published in 2000.  In some cases it is possible to follow the family through five or more generations in the western states researched. This book contains abstracts of nearly 1300 public records from the two states, including more than 600 marriages, 73 divorces, 28 probates, 80 births, over 400 deaths and even 24 voter registration records.  Eleven interesting articles from newspapers and  local histories are included for this illustrious pioneering family plus tombstone inscriptions from 68 California and Texas cemeteries.  Every name in this  easy-to-reference book  is indexed - over  3500 names of people associated with the ZUMWALTs, including more than 1600 ZUMWALTs.  Similar names included in the book are ZUMALT, ZUMAULT, ZUMOLT, ZUMWALDE and ZUMWALDT.  A must for the serious ZUMWALT researcher, this book is a continuation of the Lee’s research of the ZUMWALT family, which includes six other books covering on-site county courthouse research in states from Indiana westward. 

The cost of ZUMWALT in parts of California and Texas is $18.95, including shipping and handling.

SOLD OUT

NOTICE:  ALTHOUGH ALL COPIES OF THIS BOOK HAVE BEEN SOLD OUT, A GREAT DEAL OF ZUMWALT INFORMATION FROM THE RESEARCH THAT WENT INTO THE BOOK CAN BE FOUND AT OSWALDRelations.com.

AS ALWAYS, MANY THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST IN OUR RESEARCH, AND MAY YOUR SEARCHES BE FRUITFUL AND REWARDING.

                                                                                                 BILL and LaVONNE LEE

 


Introduction to

ZUMWALT in parts of

California and Texas

The ZUMWALTs were among the earliest white settlers in Missouri, emigrating there in the late eighteenth century.  Fort ZUMWALT was build in what is now O'Fallon, Missouri, by Jacob ZUMWALT in 1797 for protection from the not-so-peaceful Indians in a time long before citizens would have the army or any military personal loans to protect that area. It is purported to be the first log structure built north of the Missouri River.  From there the ZUMWALTs spread out over the Western United States, being early settlers in Oregon, Texas, New Mexico and California.  Many of the descendants of these early Missouri pioneers still live in the Western States and their trek through the county courthouse records has been followed in a number of books published previously by us, as well as this one.  One of these descendants, Nancy Jane ZUMWALT MOSIER COOK, born 6 June 1832 in Pike County, Missouri, and died 1 January 1899 in Pike County, Missouri, was one of Bill Lee’s Great-Great Grandmothers on his mother’s side of the family.

In 1987 we began traveling from county to county throughout the Western United States, doing research on a number of family names, ZUMWALT among them.  It soon became evident that the names ZUMWALT and ZUMALT were often interchanged for each other, so we quickly expanded the scope of our search to include both names, as well as other similar names.  During the summers of the late 1980s and early to mid 1990s we visited every county courthouse in a number of states and a few county courthouses in some other states, gathering data on the two surnames.  The facts reported in most of our books were gathered from exhaustive searches of county courthouse records and libraries in the titled states.  Books published earlier  in the ZUMWALT/ZUMALT series are ZUMWALT in Oregon, ZUMWALT in Washington, ZUMWALT in the Desert Southwest, ZUMWALT in the West, and a two-part series on Missouri and parts of Illinois.  These books can be found in many libraries and may be purchased directly from us. 

ZUMWALT in parts of California and Texas is the last of our ZUMWALT series of books, as we have exhausted our material and are no longer engaged in on-site courthouse research.  Other books in the series include abstracts of actual courthouse records that we personally viewed at courthouses throughout the Western United States.  This book is a little different.  The on-site courthouse research in this book was performed only in the California counties of Butte, Colusa and Fresno, and the only courthouse visited in Texas was that of Gonzales County.  These four counties contain a wealth of ZUMWALT information, but time constraints did not allow us to do our usual thorough research even in those counties.  A great deal of the information in this book came from the internet.  The Texas marriages are from 1968 to 2003 and were pilfered from http://www.worldvitalrecords.com.  Likewise for Texas divorces and they only include those from 1968 to 2001.  The Texas death records are from 1964 to 1998 and came from http://www.rootsweb.  That was also the source for the California death records that include those from 1940 to 1997.  The California marriage records came from microfiche provided by the California State Health Department  for the years 1961 to 1985.  The information provided on the internet is, at best, only index in nature.  When we could we supplemented the index information from the internet with information from the Social Security Files and also with information from the late Helynn Carrier’s exhaustive work, One ZUMWALT Family, published in 2000.

The book is divided into four main sections.  The first section contains selected articles from local histories and newspapers.  These are copied verbatim and are presented chronologically by date of publication.  A good many family connections and a great deal of family and local history can be found in these articles.  The second section of the book contains cemetery inscriptions.  With the exception of the Colusa City Cemetery and a few Texas cemeteries, this information also came from the internet’s http://www.findagrave.com/. The third section contains information from county records described above.  As mentioned, except for the four counties that we did personally visit, the information came from the internet indices described.  If a county is missing in the book it is because there were apparently no ZUMWALT or ZUMALT recordings in that county for the years described.  Within each county we have presented marriage records first, court records (mostly divorces) next, then probate records, followed by birth records, death records and, in the case of Colusa County, CA, voter registration records.  Each group is in chronological order by date of occurrence or date of recording.  On occasion you will discover the same person married two or more times in the marriage records, then later in the book the person’s divorce in the court records.  Then, still later in the book his or her birth record.  Obviously, the birth occurred first, and the divorce actually happened between the two marriages that appeared earlier, but appears afterward because of our chosen grouping of the records.

The last section in the book is the full-name index.  Our index is, literally, an every-name index, and then some.  Every person in the book is indexed, including both the married name and pre-married name for females.  That is, making the assumption that the time-honored custom of the bride taking the husband’s surname is adhered to.  We have also indexed the maiden and married names of women when both names are obvious.  Some examples:  On page 20 you will find that  Gilbert ZUMALT married Louise SAWDEY.  We have indexed Louise under both ZUMALT and SAWDEY.  On page 21 you will see that Susan Carol ZUMWALT married John Douglas MARSHALL.  We have indexed Susan under both ZUMWALT and MARSHALL.  Susan’s parents were Willis Ray ZUMWALT and Carol Ann ZEDIKER.  Carol Ann is indexed under both ZUMWALT and ZEDIKER.

We thank you for your interest in our work.  Please do not hesitate to let others know about our books.

Finally, we want to thank the many people who have helped make all our books possible.  First has to be the many fine citizens of all the Western States we visited who provided services to us during our travels.  Those people include RV park proprietors and employees, service station operators, restaurateurs, librarians, cemetery workers and, in general, all the fantastic people we had the privilege of coming in contact with.  And we thank all the personnel at the county courthouses who were most helpful, and even those few who were not quite as helpful, as well.  It is to this group of people we have entrusted the care of our county records.  These records are probably the most precious gift of one generation to another.

                                                      Bill and LaVonne Lee
                                              Harlingen, Texas
                                             November, 2008

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ZUMWALT in the West

Includes Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, the Dakotas

and parts of

Colorado, Iowa, Indiana, Kansas and Oklahoma

Compiled and prepared by Bill and LaVonne Lee.

 99 pages, double-columned, every-name index, softcover (8 1/2 X 11) 2008
 ISBN-13:  978-0-9818048-2-8
 ISBN-10:  0-9818048-2-9.

This book is a detailed research aid for the ZUMWALT surname in the titled states. During the late 1980s and early to mid-1990s the Lee's visited each of county courthouses of the nine states indicated in the title and some of the county courthouses in the other five states, gathering information about the ZUMWALT family from courthouse records.  The end result has been a great deal of ZUMWALT data that has been put into this book.  In some cases it is possible to follow the family through five or more generations in these states. The book contains abstracts of more than 900 public records from the area searched, including marriages, civil and criminal court cases, probates, births, deaths, military discharge recordings and interesting articles from newspapers and  local histories.  Every name in this  easy-to-reference book  is indexed - over  4000 names of people associated with the ZUMWALTs, including more than 1200 ZUMWALTs.  Similar names included in the book are SUMWALT, ZUMAULT, ZUMALT, ZUMELT, ZUMWALDE and ZUMWOLT.  A must for the serious ZUMWALT researcher, this book is a continuation of the Lee’s research of the ZUMWALT family, which includes five other books covering on-site county courthouse research in states from Indiana westward.

The cost of ZUMWALT in the West is $19.95, including shipping and handling.

SOLD OUT

NOTICE:  ALTHOUGH ALL COPIES OF THIS BOOK HAVE BEEN SOLD OUT, A GREAT DEAL OF ZUMWALT INFORMATION FROM THE RESEARCH THAT WENT INTO THE BOOK CAN BE FOUND AT OSWALDRelations.com.

AS ALWAYS, MANY THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST IN OUR RESEARCH, AND MAY YOUR SEARCHES BE FRUITFUL AND REWARDING.

                                                                                                 BILL and LaVONNE LEE

 


Introduction to

ZUMWALT in the West

The ZUMWALTs were among the earliest white settlers in Missouri, emigrating there in the late eighteenth century.  Fort ZUMWALT, built in what is now O’Fallon, Missouri, by Jacob ZUMWALT in 1797 for protection from the not-so-peaceful Indians, is purported to be the first log structure built north of the Missouri River.  From there the ZUMWALTs spread out over the Western United States, being early settlers in Oregon, Texas, New Mexico and California.  Many of the descendants of these early Missouri pioneers still live in the Western States and their trek through the county courthouse records has been followed in a number of books published previously by us, as well as this one.  One of these descendants, Nancy Jane ZUMWALT MOSIER COOK, born 6 June 1832 in Pike County, Missouri, and died 1 January 1899 in Pike County, Missouri, was one of Bill Lee’s Great-Great Grandmothers on his mother’s side of the family.

In 1987 we began traveling from county to county throughout the Western United States, doing research on a number of family names, ZUMWALT among them.  It soon became evident that the names ZUMWALT and ZUMALT were often interchanged for each other, so we quickly expanded the scope of our search to include both names, as well as other similar names.  During the summers of the late 1880s and early to mid 1990s we visited every county courthouse in a number of states and a few county courthouses in some other states, gathering data on the two surnames.  The facts reported in this book were gathered from exhaustive searches of county courthouse records and libraries in the titled states and are described below.  Books published earlier  in the ZUMWALT/ZUMALT series are ZUMWALT in Oregon, ZUMWALT in Washington, ZUMWALT in the Desert Southwest and a two part series on Missouri and parts of Illinois.  These books can be found in many libraries and may be purchased directly from us.  We plan on publishing the results of  more of our research findings from over 800 county courthouses in the Western United States as time permits.

We researched every county courthouse in the states of Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming.  If a county is missing in the book from any of these states it is because we did not find any records for the subject names in the missing counties, not because we did not look there.  We did not find a single record for the researched names in the entire state of South Dakota, but we did look there.  Nevada is a paradox.  Even though a very few of the researched families lived there, a good many marriages of these families were married there, and a few were divorced there as well.  The ZUMWALTs from the other states in the book usually lived in the state where the records were recorded.

Time and resources did not allow us to research in every county in the other states included in the book.  The counties researched in those states were: 

Colorado – Baca, Bent, Crowley, Otero and Prowers. 

Iowa – Hamilton, Harrison, Mills and Webster. 

Indiana – Brown, Carroll, Dubois, Elkhart, Fountain, Henry, Huntington, Kosciusko, Lake, Noble, Parke,                  Vermillion, Wabash, Warren, Wayne and Whitley.

     Kansas – Cowley, Harvey, Sedgwick and Sumner. 

     Oklahoma – Alfalfa, Beaver, Cimarron, Craig, Delaware, Grant, Harper, Kay, Mayes, Nowata, Osage, Ottawa,           Rogers, Texas, Tulsa, Washington and Woods. 

As stated earlier, if any of these counties are missing from the book, it is because we did not find any of the subject names there.

The county records we concentrated on most were marriages, civil and criminal court cases, probates, births, deaths and military discharge recordings.  Conspicuously absent from this list are land records.  Even though we recognize the genealogical value of these records, we did not  include land records in our search because of the volume of this type record.  We also did not include court records from any of the lower courts.  Only cases from the Circuit or District courts  are reported.  Records in city courts and lower county courts are too voluminous and contain such things as minor (and some not so minor) traffic violations.  Not only does searching these records take an inordinate amount of time and book space, the maintenance of these records is inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another, and often is not even available.  However, the presence of ZUMWALTs and/or ZUMALTs  in a particular area can be determined from the records we have included in the book, and further research in a specific area may be performed if one desires.

The book is divided into three main sections.  The first section contains selected articles from local histories and newspapers (mostly obituaries).  These are copied verbatim, except in a few instances where we felt compelled to correct atrocious grammar (ours isn’t all that great either, but occasionally we had to interfere) or obvious errors in content.  These articles are presented chronologically by date of publication.  A good many family connections and a great deal of family and local history can be found in these articles.  The second section contains abstracts of county records from each county where we did research.  The counties included in this book are shown above.  Once again. if a county from the group indicated is missing it is because we did not find any ZUMWALT or ZUMALT recordings in that county.  Within each county we have presented marriage records first, Circuit Court (or District Court) records (both civil and criminal) next, then probate records, followed by birth records, death records and military discharge recordings.  There are even a couple of Voter Registration Records.  Each group is in chronological order by date of occurrence or date of recording.  On occasion you will discover the same person married two or more times in the marriage records, then later in the book the person’s divorce in the court records.  Then, still later in the book his or her birth record.  Obviously, the birth occurred first, and the divorce actually happened between the two marriages that appeared earlier, but appears afterward because of our chosen grouping of the records.

The last section in the book is the full-name index.  Our index is, literally, an every-name index, and then some.  Every person in the book is indexed, including both the married name and pre-married name for brides.  That is, making the assumption that the time-honored custom of the bride taking the husband’s surname is adhered to.  We have also indexed the maiden and married names of women when both names are obvious.  Some examples:  On page 27 you will find that Jon Raymond ZUMALT married Nancy Jean TRUE.  We have indexed Nancy under both ZUMALT and TRUE.  On page 46 you will see that Janet Elaine ZUMWALT married Ronald Dale YARBROUGH.  We have indexed Janet under both ZUMWALT and YARBROUGH.  Janet’s parents were Doyle ZUMWALT and Mary JORDAN.  Mary is indexed under both ZUMWALT and JORDAN.

A few words need to be said about research at county courthouses.  First, the quality and content of county records vary widely from one jurisdiction to another, and also over time.  The early records are usually very brief – for example, early marriages might only show a bride, a groom and who married them.  Later marriages would list more genealogical data such as date and place of birth, occupation and parents names.  On jurisdictional differences, in general, Nevada marriage records contained a great deal more data at an early date than Idaho records.  In all cases, we have attempted to report all the available information we were able to locate.

Secondly, on the subject of doing research in county courthouses, a researcher is totally at the mercy of the personnel working in the various courthouses.  Some counties have personnel who are both knowledgeable and helpful, while other counties have clerks who are neither.  Thankfully, the norm is usually the former.  We have been in courthouses that were so enjoyable that we hated to leave, and others where we were sorry we ever went.  On a few instances we were denied access to records,  sometimes for valid legal reasons, other times because of a misinterpretation of a law or clerk indifference, and occasionally because the record in question could not be found.  These are indicated in the book.  The bottom line is that research in county courthouses is an adventure, and this adventure is reflected in the contents of this book.

While on the subject of researching county records, or research of any kind for that matter, quite often the records are handwritten, and not always easy to decipher.  We have tried to translate these various attempts at penmanship the best that we can, but can assure you that we have been far from 100% accurate in this undertaking.  It is also worth mentioning that the same name will quite often appear differently on the same document – both on handwritten and printed documents for that matter.  ZUMWALT and ZUMALT is a prime example of this.  At all times we have done the best we could in deciphering and reporting what we have seen.

The source material in courthouse records is sometimes in error, and other times difficult to interpret.  There is also the case where we have introduced errors in the transcription of the data, though we have made every attempt to minimize this type error.  Some of the records list a great deal of useful information, others hardly any.  We have attempted to report all the information contained in the original records.  Some of the court records are subject to individual interpretation.  We are not attorneys, and have attempted to only summarize the content of the court cases.  Any person interested in more detail on these cases may find the case files available to the public at the indicated county by requesting the indicated case number.

We have volumes of ZUMWALT/ZUMALT related data yet  to be assembled into book form, and new publications will be shown at our website when they are completed.  In the meantime we thank you for your interest in our work.  Please do not hesitate to let others know about our books.

Finally, we want to thank the many people who have helped make this book possible.  First has to be the many fine citizens of Illinois and Missouri who provided services to us during our travels.  Those people include RV park proprietors and employees, service station operators, restaurateurs, and, in general, all the fantastic people we had the privilege of coming in contact with.  And we thank all the personnel at the county courthouses who were most helpful, and even those few who were not quite as helpful, as well.  It is to this group of people we have entrusted the care of our county records.  These records are probably the most precious gift of one generation to another.


                                                                                                         Bill and LaVonne Lee
                                                                                                         Harlingen, Texas
                                                                                                         July 2008

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ZUMWALT
In Parts of
Missouri and Illinois
Volume I

Compiled and prepared by Bill and LaVonne Lee.

108 pages, double-columned, every-name index, softcover (8 1/2 X 11) 2007.

The ZUMWALTs were among those who were the earliest settlers of what is now the State of Missouri, and their name is included among the records of many of Missouri's counties, and also Pike and Calhoun counties, just across the Mississippi River, in Illinois..

During the summers of 1994 and 1995 the Lee's visited each of Missouri's county courthouses and the courthouses of the two Illinois counties mentioned, compiling an amazing list of ZUMWALT information. They have presented this information in an attractive, easy-to-reference book.  Included in the book are thumbnail sketches of more than 500 marriage records, over 200 civil and criminal court cases, 122 probate records and more than 100 other type records that include births,  deaths,  military discharge  recordings and  directory  listings.  The first section of the book contains nearly 90 interesting articles  from newspapers and local histories, as well as cemetery inscriptions from 21 cemeteries in the area reported.  The area covered in Volume I includes Calhoun and Pike counties in Illinois, and , taken alphabetically, Adair through Iron counties in Missouri.  Jackson through Wright counties in Missouri are covered in Volume II.  Other similar names included in the book are, ZUMALTZUMAULT, ZUMEWALT, ZUMWALD, ZUMWALL and ZUMWAULT.  The information reported covers the period from 1797 into 1996.  Every name in the book is indexed - over 3600 names of people associated with the ZUMWALTs, including more than 1200 ZUMWALTs and 200 ZUMALTs.
 
Be sure to advise any other ZUMWALT researchers who would like to benefit from this informative book, and keep in mind that ZUMWALT in Parts of Missouri and Illinois, Volume I and/or Volume II, would make an outstanding gift for any ZUMWALT or ZUMALT family tree researcher.

The cost of ZUMWALT in Parts of Missouri and Illinois, Volume I,  is $20.95, including shipping and handling.
 
SOLD OUT

NOTICE:  ALTHOUGH ALL COPIES OF THIS BOOK HAVE BEEN SOLD OUT, A GREAT DEAL OF ZUMWALT INFORMATION FROM THE RESEARCH THAT WENT INTO THE BOOK CAN BE FOUND AT OSWALDRelations.com.

AS ALWAYS, MANY THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST IN OUR RESEARCH, AND MAY YOUR SEARCHES BE FRUITFUL AND REWARDING.

                                                                                                 BILL and LaVONNE LEE


ZUMWALT
In Parts of
Missouri and Illinois
Volume II

Compiled and prepared by Bill and LaVonne Lee.

119 pages, double-columned, every-name index, softcover (8 1/2 X 11) 2007.

The ZUMWALTs were among those who were the earliest settlers of what is now the State of Missouri, and their name is included among the records of many of Missouri's counties, and also Pike and Calhoun counties, just across the Mississippi River, in Illinois..

During the summers of 1994 and 1995 the Lee's visited each of Missouri's county courthouses and the courthouses of the two Illinois counties mentioned, compiling an amazing list of ZUMWALT information. They have presented this information in an attractive, easy-to-reference book.  Included in the book are thumbnail sketches of more than 700 marriage records, nearly 300 civil and criminal court cases, more than 100 probate records and a smattering of other type records including births,  military discharge  recordings and  directory  listings.  The first section of the book contains 59 interesting articles  from newspapers and local histories. Section 2 lists tombstone inscriptions from 33 cemeteries in the area reported.  The area covered in Volume II includes the Missouri counties, taken alphabetically, from Jackson to Wright.  Calhoun and Pike counties in Illinois, and, taken alphabetically, Adair through Iron counties in Missouri are covered in Volume I.  Other similar names included in the book are, ZUMALL, ZUMALTZUMAULT, ZUMWALD, ZUMWALS, ZUMWLDT and ZUMWOLT (keeping in mind that some of these names may be from indecipherable source records or clerk error).  The information reported covers the period from 1797 into 1996.  Every name in the book is included in the full-name index - over 4000 names of people associated with the ZUMWALTs, including more than 1500 ZUMWALTs and 200 ZUMALTs.
 
Be sure to advise any other ZUMWALT researchers who would like to benefit from this informative book, and keep in mind that ZUMWALT in Parts of Missouri and Illinois, Volume I and/or Volume II, would make an outstanding gift for any ZUMWALT or ZUMALT family tree researcher.

The cost of ZUMWALT in Parts of Missouri and Illinois, Volume II,  is $21.95, including shipping and handling.
 
SOLD OUT

NOTICE:  ALTHOUGH ALL COPIES OF THIS BOOK HAVE BEEN SOLD OUT, A GREAT DEAL OF ZUMWALT INFORMATION FROM THE RESEARCH THAT WENT INTO THE BOOK CAN BE FOUND AT OSWALDRelations.com.

AS ALWAYS, MANY THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST IN OUR RESEARCH, AND MAY YOUR SEARCHES BE FRUITFUL AND REWARDING.

                                                                                                 BILL and LaVONNE LEE


Introduction to

ZUMWALT
In Parts of
Missouri and Illinois
Volume II

The ZUMWALTs were among the earliest white settlers in Missouri, emigrating there in the late eighteenth century.  Fort ZUMWALT, built in what is now O’Fallon, Missouri, by Jacob ZUMWALT in 1797 for protection from the not-so-peaceful Indians, is purported to be the first log structure built north of the Missouri River.  From there the ZUMWALTs spread out over the remainder of Missouri, as well as the Western United States in general, being early settlers in Oregon, Texas, New Mexico and California.  Many of the descendants of these early Missouri pioneers still live in Missouri and the two Illinois counties covered in this book.  One of these descendants, Nancy Jane ZUMWALT MOSIER COOK, born 6 June 1832 in Pike County, Missouri, and died 1 January 1899 in Pike County, Missouri, was one of Bill Lee’s Great-Great Grandmothers on his mother’s side of the family.

In 1987 we began traveling from county to county throughout the Western United States, doing research on a number of family names, ZUMWALT among them.  It soon became evident that the names ZUMWALT and ZUMALT were often interchanged for each other, so we quickly expanded the scope of our search to include both names.  During the summers of 1994 and 1995 we visited every county courthouse in Missouri and two Illinois counties gathering data on the two names.  This book, Volume II of a two-part set, deals with information found in Missouri counties, taken alphabetically, Jackson through Wright.  Pike and Calhoun counties in Illinois, and, taken alphabetically, Adair County through Iron County in Missouri are covered in a similar manner in Volume I.  The facts reported in these two books were gathered from exhaustive searches of county courthouse records, libraries, cemeteries and directories.  Books published earlier  in the ZUMWALT/ZUMALT series are ZUMWALT in Oregon, ZUMWALT in Washington and ZUMWALT in the Desert Southwest.  These books can be found in many libraries and may be purchased directly from us.  We plan on publishing the results of  more of our research findings from over 800 county courthouses in the Western United States as time permits.

The county records we concentrated on most were marriages, civil and criminal court cases, probates, births, deaths and military discharge recordings.  Conspicuously absent from this list are land records.  Even though we recognize the genealogical value of these records, we did not  include land records in our search because of the volume of this type record.  We also did not include court records from any of the lower courts.  Only cases from the Circuit Court  are reported.  Records in city courts and lower county courts are too voluminous and contain such things as minor (and some not so minor) traffic violations.  Not only does searching these records take an inordinate amount of time and book space, the maintenance of these records is inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another, and often is not even available.  However, the presence of ZUMWALTs and/or ZUMALTs  in a particular area can be determined from the records we have included in the book, and further research in a specific area may be performed if one desires.

The book is divided into five main sections.  The first section contains selected articles from local histories and newspapers (mostly obituaries).  These are copied verbatim, except in a few instances where we felt compelled to correct atrocious grammar (ours isn’t all that great either, but occasionally we had to interfere) or obvious errors in content.  These articles are presented chronologically by date of publication.  A good many family connections and a great deal of family and local history can be found in these articles.  The second section is a list of tombstone inscriptions from Missouri cemeteries for ZUMWALT, ZUMALT and some related families.  We have visited some of these cemeteries at one time or the other, and personally observed several of the inscriptions.  However, most of the inscriptions shown came from publications found in libraries.  These have been published by local genealogists who have walked the various cemeteries and recorded the inscriptions.

The third section contains abstracts of county records from each county where we did research.  The counties included in this book are shown above.  If a county from the group indicated is missing it is because we did not find any ZUMWALT or ZUMALT recordings in that county.  Within each county we have presented marriage records first, Circuit Court records (both civil and criminal) next, then probate records, followed by birth records, death records and military discharge recordings.  Each group is in chronological order by date of occurrence or date of recording.  On occasion you will discover the same person married two or more times in the marriage records, then later in the book the person’s divorce in the court records.  Then, still later in the book his or her birth record.  Obviously, the birth occurred first, and the divorce actually happened between the two marriages that appeared earlier, but appears afterward because of our chosen grouping of the records.

The next section on the book contains directory information – street address and phone number of ZUMWALTs and ZUMALTs living in the covered area.  We make no claim that these names include every ZUMWALT or ZUMALT living in the area, or that the names, addresses or phone numbers are current.  We only hope that the listings, which were taken from switchboard.com on the internet, are relatively accurate.  This section is presented alphabetically by name within state and city.

The last section in the book is the full-name index.  Our index is, literally, an every-name index, and then some.  Every person in the book is indexed, including both the married name and pre-married name for brides.  That is, making the assumption that the time-honored custom of the bride taking the husband’s surname is adhered to.  We have also indexed the maiden and married names of women when both names are obvious.  Some examples:  On page 85 you will find that James Dennis ZUMWALT married Linda Lou CANTRIEL.  We have indexed Linda under both ZUMWALT and CANTRIEL.  On the same page you will see that Grace E ZUMWALT married John E BURKE.  We have indexed Grace under both ZUMWALT and BURKE.

A few words need to be said about research at county courthouses.  First, the quality and content of county records vary widely from one jurisdiction to another, and also over time.  The early records are usually very brief – for example, early marriages might only show a bride, a groom and who married them.  Later marriages would list more genealogical data such as date and place of birth, etc.  On jurisdictional differences, in general, Illinois marriage records shown in Volume I contained a great deal more data at an early date than Missouri records did.  We also might mention that we happened to find two Illinois counties where public  records seem to be a little more public than in other Illinois counties we have attempted to research in the past.

Secondly, on the subject of doing research in county courthouses, a researcher is totally at the mercy of the personnel working in the various courthouses.  Some counties have personnel who are both knowledgeable and helpful, while other counties have clerks who are neither.  Thankfully, the norm is usually the former.  We have been in courthouses that were so enjoyable that we hated to leave, and others where we were sorry we ever went.  We encountered one Missouri county where public probate records were only available to the public on a certain day of the week, and then only for a fee.  On a few instances we were denied access to records,  sometimes for valid legal reasons, other times because of a misinterpretation of a law or clerk indifference, and occasionally because the record in question could not be found.  These are indicated in the book.  The bottom line is that research in county courthouses is an adventure, and this adventure is reflected in the contents of this book.

While on the subject of researching county records, or research of any kind for that matter, quite often the records are handwritten, and not always easy to decipher.  We have tried to translate these various attempts at penmanship the best that we can, but can assure you that we have been far from 100% accurate in this undertaking.  It is also worth mentioning that the same name will quite often appear differently on the same document – both on handwritten and printed documents for that matter.  ZUMWALT and ZUMALT is a prime example of this.  At all times we have done the best we could in deciphering and reporting what we have seen.

The source material in courthouse records is sometimes in error, and other times difficult to interpret.  There is also the case where we have introduced errors in the transcription of the data, though we have made every attempt to minimize this type error.  Some of the records list a great deal of useful information, others hardly any.  We have attempted to report all the information contained in the original records.  Some of the court records are subject to individual interpretation.  We are not attorneys, and have attempted to only summarize the content of the court cases.  Any person interested in more detail on these cases may find the case files available to the public at the indicated county by requesting the indicated case number.

As mentioned above, we have done a great deal of research on family names.  A full list of all our published research efforts may be seen at http://www.baseballundertaker.com, and our books may be purchased through that website.  We have volumes of ZUMWALT/ZUMALT related data yet  to be assembled into book form, and new publications will be shown at our website when they are completed.  In the meantime we thank you for your interest in our work.  Please do not hesitate to let others know about our books.

Finally, we want to thank the many people who have helped make this book possible.  First has to be the many fine citizens of Illinois and Missouri who provided services to us during our travels.  Those people include RV park proprietors and employees, service station operators, restaurateurs, and, in general, all the fantastic people we had the privilege of coming in contact with.  And we thank all the personnel at the county courthouses who were most helpful, and even those few who were not quite as helpful, as well.  It is to this group of people we have entrusted the care of our county records.  These records are probably the most precious gift of one generation to another.

                                                                                                         Bill and LaVonne Lee
                                                                                                         P O Box 321
                                                                                                         La Feria TX  78559
                                                                                                         956-364-1077

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ZUMWALT in Oregon

Compiled and prepared by Bill and LaVonne Lee.

70 pages, double-columned, full-name index, softcover (8 1/2 X 11) 1989.
ISBN-13: 
978-0-9795830-3-2.
ISBN-10:  0-9795830-3-9.


The ZUMWALTs were among those who were the earliest settlers of what is now the State of Oregon, and their name is included among the records of nearly every one of Oregon's counties.

During the summer of 1988 the Lee's visited each of Oregon's thirty-six county courthouses and compiled an amazing list of ZUMWALT information. They have presented this information in an attractive, easy-to-reference book.  Included in the book are thumbnail sketches of nearly 300 marriage records, more than 200 civil and criminal court cases, 50 probate records and over 300 other type records that include births,  deaths,  military discharge  recordings,  directory  listings and interesting articles  from newspapers and local histories.  Included in the articles are stories of two nineteenth century murders, a brief autobiography of an early state legislator and interesting stories told by early ZUMWALT settlers. Other similar names included in the book are, ZUMMAULT, ZUMALTZUMWALDT and ZUMWALTS.  The information reported covers the period from 1845 into 1988.  Every name in the book is indexed - over 2800 names of people associated with the ZUMWALTs, including more than 1000 ZUMWALTs.
 
Be sure to advise any other ZUMWALT researchers who would like to benefit from this informative book, and keep in mind that ZUMWALT in Oregon would make an outstanding gift for any ZUMWALT family tree researcher.

The cost of ZUMWALT in Oregon is $17.95, including shipping and handling. 
 
SOLD OUT

NOTICE:  ALTHOUGH ALL COPIES OF THIS BOOK HAVE BEEN SOLD OUT, A GREAT DEAL OF ZUMWALT INFORMATION FROM THE RESEARCH THAT WENT INTO THE BOOK CAN BE FOUND AT OSWALDRelations.com.

AS ALWAYS, MANY THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST IN OUR RESEARCH, AND MAY YOUR SEARCHES BE FRUITFUL AND REWARDING.

                                                                                                 BILL and LaVONNE LEE


ZUMWALT in Washington

Compiled and prepared by Bill and LaVonne Lee.

63 pages, double-columned, every-name index, softcover (8 1/2 X 11) 1990.
 
This book is a detailed research aid for the ZUMWALT family in the State of Washington.  During the summer of 1988 the Lee's visited each of Washington's 39 county courthouses, gathering information about the ZUMWALT family from courthouse records.  The end result has been a great deal of ZUMWALT data that has been put into this book.  In some cases it is possible to follow the family through four generations in the state. The book contains thumbnail sketches of more than 600 public records from 35 of the 39 counties searched, including marriages, civil and criminal court cases, probates, births, deaths, military discharge recordings, directory listings and interesting articles from newspapers and  local histories.   Every   name  in   this  easy-to-reference  book  is indexed - over  2300  names  of people associated with the ZUMWALTs, including more than 1000 ZUMWALTs.  Similar names included in the book are ZUMALT, ZUMMWALT, ZUMWALDT and ZUMWAT.  The earliest ZUMWALT record found was an 1876 marriage and the book includes records from that date up into 1988.

Be sure to advise other ZUMWALT researchers who would like to benefit from this informative book, and keep in mind that ZUMWALT in Washington would make an outstanding gift for any ZUMWALT family tree researcher.

The cost of ZUMWALT in Washington is $16.95, including shipping and handling.

SOLD OUT

NOTICE:  ALTHOUGH ALL COPIES OF THIS BOOK HAVE BEEN SOLD OUT, A GREAT DEAL OF ZUMWALT INFORMATION FROM THE RESEARCH THAT WENT INTO THE BOOK CAN BE FOUND AT OSWALDRelations.com.

AS ALWAYS, MANY THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST IN OUR RESEARCH, AND MAY YOUR SEARCHES BE FRUITFUL AND REWARDING.

                                                                                                 BILL and LaVONNE LEE


ZUMWALT
in the
Desert Southwest

Compiled and prepared by Bill and LaVonne Lee.

55 pages, double-columned, every-name index, softcover (8 1/2 X 11) 2004.
 
During 1989 and 1990 the Lee's visited every county courthouse in the states of Arizona and New Mexico, accumulating an amazing collection of information on the ZUMWALT family.  They are now presenting their collection in this book that contains thumbnail sketches of more than 500 public records, including marriages, civil and criminal court cases, probates, deaths, military discharge recordings, cemetery lists and interesting articles from newspapers and local histories.  Every name is indexed - nearly 2000 names, including over 600 ZUMWALTs.  Other similar names in the index are ZUMAULT, ZUMALT, ZUMOLT and ZUMOULT.  The earliest record  found was recorded in 1862, but the earliest ZUMWALT  resident seems  to have  arrived  in  Eastern New Mexico about 1872. 

Of particular interest is a range war the ZUMWALTs were involved in that turned deadly, and resulted in the participants moving their family from Eastern New Mexico to a remote spot in the western part of the state.  This is documented at the time it occurred, and then in the memoir of a member of the family many years later.

Be sure to advise other ZUMWALT researchers who would benefit from this informative book, and keep in mind that ZUMWALT in the Desert Southwest would make an outstanding gift for any ZUMWALT family tree researcher.

The cost of ZUMWALT in the Desert Southwest is $15.95, including shipping and handling.
 

SOLD OUT


NOTICE:  ALTHOUGH ALL COPIES OF THIS BOOK HAVE BEEN SOLD OUT, A GREAT DEAL OF ZUMWALT INFORMATION FROM THE RESEARCH THAT WENT INTO THE BOOK CAN BE FOUND AT OSWALDRelations.com.

AS ALWAYS, MANY THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST IN OUR RESEARCH, AND MAY YOUR SEARCHES BE FRUITFUL AND REWARDING.

                                                                                                 BILL and LaVONNE LEE


Introduction To

ZUMWALT
in the
Desert Southwest

This is a book of facts gathered from the public records of the states of Arizona and New Mexico on the names ZUMALT,  ZUMWALT, and other similar spellings of the ZUM_____ name.  Since these names are so alike in sound and appearance, they are often mistaken for each other, and sometimes interchanged.  It is not uncommon to find the same person's name spelled differently on the same document.  In all cases we have attempted to report what we saw, so these inconsistencies appear in this book.

The earliest appearance of any of these names in the record repositories of these states is a military court martial filed against a Salomon ZUMOULT in 1862.  According to the record, which was found in the New Mexico State Archives in Santa Fe, Sgt ZUMOULT was acquitted, and released from arrest.  It was seventeen years later, in 1879, when Thomas Bowen and Pauline Elizabeth (PAUL) ZUMWALT moved their young family from Kerr County, Texas, to Chaves County in New Mexico Territory, to become what was probably the first permanent ZUMWALT resident of New Mexico.  They were quickly followed by other ZUMWALT cousins from Texas, and descendants of these early ZUMWALTs still live in many parts of the state.  Among these early ZUMWALTs were the brothers, Charles Alex and William M (later known as William Thomas) ZUMWALT, who became notorious as the killers of the HALL brothers in a range feud in 1911.  A vivid newspaper account of this incident is included in this book.  Jodie ZUMWALT, a cousin of Will and Alex, was the sheriff of Chaves County during the 1920s, and he was also involved in a shooting in the wild west that was New Mexico.  An account of this killing is also included in the book.  Another early ZUMWALT found in the records was a Harvey H ZUMWALT, who, the records tell us, was more conventional than those just described, operating a stationery store in Santa Fe as early as 1893.  Harvey's descendants are not obvious from the records alone, but today ZUMWALT records can be found throughout the state, with the heaviest concentrations found in Bernalillo, Chaves, Grant, Lincoln and Luna counties.  Evidence from these public records leave little doubt regarding ZUMWALT relationships.

The earliest ZUMWALT record in Arizona is the marriage of Myrta ZUMWALT in Gila County during 1899.  This record is only the first of many ZUMWALT records over the years in all parts of Arizona, with the heaviest concentration being in Maricopa and Mohave counties, and, of course, in Yuma County where so many Californians were married during the 1930s, 40s and 50s.

In addition to searching county records, we also spent a period of time at each state's historical library, and at the New Mexico State Archives in Santa Fe, where territorial records for New Mexico are maintained.  In these places we found a variety of interesting articles from newspapers and local histories.  We have selected some of these articles, and included them in the first section of this book.  These articles have been presented in a chronological order, with citations to the source of the article given.

The second section of the book contains the abstraction of records from each of the two state's county courthouses.  If a county is not included, it has been omitted because we did not find any ZUMWALT recordings in that county.  Marriage records are listed first, then civil and criminal court cases, probates, births, deaths, and any miscellaneous type records that include military discharge recordings.  Each group of records is presented in order by date of occurrence, within record type, within county.  The counties are listed in alphabetical order, within state, with Arizona listed first, only because it is earliest in the alphabet.

The death records in the second section of the book are a mixture of county death records and social security records.  The State Health Departments in both Arizona and New Mexico have had control of both birth and death records since early in the twentieth century, and, like state health departments in most states, they maintain a tight, proprietary rein on these records. This being the case, the only local birth and death records available are those few the counties gathered prior to state involvement.  However, in recent years, the Social Security Administration has made their death records available to the public.  The information with these records includes the death date (usually just a month and year), the birth date, the state from which the person originally applied for a Social Security Card, the city/county/state where the person resided when he/she died (sometimes this is the place the final check was sent), and the Social Security Number (which we have chosen not to include in the book).

A few words need to be said about research at county courthouses.  First, a researcher is totally at the mercy of the personnel working in the various courthouses.  Some counties have personnel who are both knowledgeable and helpful, while other counties have personnel who are neither.  The norm is somewhere between these two extremes, and our experiences are generally around the norm.  However, we must take this opportunity to cite those which are at both extremes from this norm.  We will start with the good news first.   In general, the county systems and personnel in both Arizona and New Mexico were good.  Yuma and Yavapai counties in Arizona were perhaps the best in that state.  The size of Maricopa County made it difficult to work there, and the quality of their filmed records was difficult to read, but at least the personnel at that county are trying to serve a demanding public, which is more than some counties attempt to do.  The counties in eastern New Mexico seemed to be somewhat easier to work in than others in that state.  Some of them had sophisticated computer systems that made our job very simple, and fast.  The only real complaint about public record systems in New Mexico was that the counties did not have their records prior to statehood.  These are maintained at the New Mexico State Archives in Santa Fe.  This made it necessary to look in two places for each county's records, but we must say that the personnel at the archives were most helpful and cooperative.

However, all the counties in both states do not fit on the good side of the ledger.  There are no records in this book from Arizona's Navajo County.  Navajo is such a small county that there might not be any ZUMWALT data there to report, but the important thing is that we were not even allowed to see the records in order to make our own determination of that fact.  In our mind, it is totally inexcusable that public records are not made available for the public's review.  Fortunately, Navajo County was the only such county in both Arizona and New Mexico, and one of the few we have encountered in out travels.  Those travels now include over 400 counties in 16 western states.

Meanwhile, back to the book.  The final section of the book contains a list of ZUMWALTs now living in Arizona and New Mexico.  These names were mostly extracted from current telephone directories, and we make no claim to listing all the ZUMWALTs now living in the two state area.  We only hope the listings are reasonably accurate.

To the best of our knowledge, every name in this book, with the exception of those in this introduction, is contained in the index.  Women's names have been indexed to their pre-marriage name and to their married name.  For example, Virginia PAYNE, who married a ZUMWALT, is indexed under both PAYNE and ZUMWALT.  Likewise, Elsie ZUMWALT, who married a LACKEY, is indexed under both LACKEY and ZUMWALT.  The number of occurrences of a name in a column is given by a number enclosed in parenthesis, and the column is indicated by "a" for the left column, and "b" for the right column.

We have attempted to report the data as we saw it.  However, some of the source material is sometimes in error, and other times difficult to interpret.  There is also the case where we have introduced errors in the transcription of the data, though we have made every attempt to minimize this type error.  Some of the records list a great deal of information, others hardly any.  We have attempted to report all the information contained in the original records.  Some of the court records are subject to individual interpretation.  We are not attorneys, and have attempted to only summarize the content of the court cases.  Any individual interested in more detail on these cases may find the case files available to the public at the indicated county by requesting the specified case number.

Finally, we want to thank the many people who have helped make this book possible.  First has to be the many fine citizens of both states who provided services for us during our nearly four-months there in 1989 and 1990.  Those people include RV park employees, service station employees, restaurateurs, and in general, every one of the fine Arizonians and New Mexicans we had the privilege to come in contact with.  The personnel at the various libraries and archives were especially helpful, and deserve a special thanks.  Finally, but not least, we thank all the personnel at the county courthouses who were most helpful, and those who were not quite as helpful as well.  It is to this group of people we have entrusted the care of our county records.  These records are probably the most precious gift of one generation to another.

                                                                                                    Bill and LaVonne Lee
                                                                                                    Smithfield, Utah
                                                                                                    November 1991

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RELATED  WEBSITES

OSWALDRelations.com.

The Joseph Zumwalt Story by Russ Robinson.

ZUMWALT Genealogy and Family History Data at mycinnamontoast.com.

ZUMALT Genealogy and Family History Data at mycinnamontoast.com.

ZUMWALT Genealogy and Family History at OneGreatFamily.com.

ZUMALT Genealogy and Family History at OneGreatFamily.com.

ZUMWALT Genealogy and Family History at Ancestry.com.

ZUMALT Genealogy and Family History at Ancestry.com.

ZUMWALT Records at Footnote.com.

ZUMALT Records at Footnote.com.


THE OREGON TRAIL AND ITS PIONEERS.

ZUMWALT Cemetery Records at Findagrave.com.

ZUMALT Cemetery Records at Findagrave.com.

ZUMWALT Cemetery Records at Interment.net.

ZUMALT Cemetery Records at Interment.net.

ZUMWALT at Genealogy Today.

ZUMALT at Genealogy Today.

ZUMWALT Queries at CousinConnect.com.

ZUMALT Queries at CousinConnect.com.


OTHER WORTHWHILE WEBSITES

For the best price on hotels, click here:

Hotels.com

Click here to see what CompuVest has to offer:


And for Domains, Web Hosting, Email and other Software Services, click here:
  GoDaddy.com Hosting & Servers

Some helpful Genealogy Websites follow.  Click onto each to view.

DNA

Banner - Ancestry.com

Search for Ancestors at OneGreatFamily.com

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